Brooklyn Boro

June 12: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 12, 2023 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1933, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Strong indication from correspondence between the Mayor and the city’s creditors that subway fares will be boosted after the Fall election was greeted yesterday by George Lenz, municipal chairman of the Farragut Civic League, as a logical move toward relieving the city’s financial difficulties. Lenz also welcomed the fare increase hint as the means of settling a rather heated controversy in his own club. A lusty voiced contingent of the league membership assailed bitterly the proposed automobile taxes at last Thursday’s session and an equally emphatic group, who, it seemed, do not own cars, declared the autos, not real estate or transit lines, should be compelled to carry the City through its crisis. They objected also to threats of water rate increases. ‘Our motorist members are objecting strenuously to an increase in the volume of taxes they carry already,’ Lenz declared. ‘They are, for the most part, owners of homes as well as cars and they feel the subway fare should be increased to relieve the burden on real estate. These people can’t afford to pay any additional auto registration taxes. Why, many of them have had their cars parked in their garages since last December. They’re waiting to take advantage of the half rate on State registration plates, which goes into effect July 1.’ A tax on subway riders, Lenz asserted, is far more equitable than additional taxes for the motorist, ‘because the subways have been running heavy deficits for years and because subway facilities are used not only by New Yorkers, who share other city taxes, but also by thousands of out-of-towners.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “BIRMINGHAM, MICH. (AP) — Little Frankie Strafaci is giving ‘the folks back home’ a great run for their money. The slim, 21-year-old youth from Brooklyn, playing in his first national open golf championship, is low-scoring amateur as golf’s most grueling test swung into today’s 36-hole final battle. Competing with the greatest campaigners in the game, he doesn’t figure to win — but regardless of his finish he thinks he already has justified the faith his family has placed in his ability. It hasn’t been just a matter of telling Frankie to play golf and then wishing him luck, for the Strafaci clan members have backed their hopes for Frankie with cold cash — cash to play golf as much as he wishes while they work; cash to make a Winter golf practice trip to Florida; cash to come to his first national open. ‘I have four brothers — Dominic plays in the seventies,’ the dark-haired, good-looking youngster said, as he surveyed the other scores about and below his snappy 36-hole card of 142. ‘Any of them probably could beat me if they practiced. But they told me go ahead and play; you’re the best bet and we think you can go someplace.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “All Loew’s theaters will present a free package of Personna shaving blades to the first 50 fathers attending a Loew’s house on Father’s Day, June 20.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — The forest service has hired 250 ‘smoke jumpers’ to form the ‘first line of defense’ against fires in Western backwoods this Summer.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “TUSCALOOSA, ALA. (UPI) — Gov. George C. Wallace, defiant to the end, bowed yesterday in the face of troops sent by President Kennedy and admitted two Negroes to the all-white University of Alabama. Wallace stood aside —  after waiting for five hours for the troops to arrive — and permitted Negroes Vivian Malone and James A. Hood to enter Foster Auditorium to register for the summer term. Earlier, Wallace flatly defied Kennedy’s order to ‘cease and desist’ interfering with the court-ordered enrollment of the two students. Standing in the blazing Alabama sunshine, Wallace read a proclamation denying them admission. Then, shortly after the first contingent of 100 battle-equipped guardsmen rolled onto the campus, Wallace appeared again in front of Foster Auditorium to capitulate. Wallace described the presence of the troops, and the admission of the Negroes, as a ‘bitter pill to swallow.’ He urged again that there be no violence. Kennedy signed an executive order federalizing about 17,000 Alabama National Guardsmen and authorizing the use of army troops if necessary to enroll the two Negroes.”

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Hideki Matsui
Seth Wenig/AP
Kerry Kittles
Marty Lederhandler/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “It’s a Small World (After All)” composer Richard M. Sherman, who was born in 1928; broadcaster and Basketball Hall of Famer Marv Albert, who was born in 1941; “Sesame Street” star Sonia Manzano, who was born in 1950; “thirtysomething” star Timothy Busfield, who was born in 1957; “The Kids in the Hall” star Scott Thompson, who was born in 1959; psychologist and cultural critic Jordan Peterson, who was born in 1962; former N.J. Nets shooting guard Kerry Kittles, who was born in 1974; former N.Y. Yankees outfielder and 2009 World Series MVP Hideki Matsui, who was born in 1974; 2004 NBA Sixth Man of the Year Antawn Jamison, who was born in 1976; former NFL tight end and Super Bowl champion Dallas Clark, who was born in 1979; and actress and supermodel Adriana Lima, who was born in 1981.

Adriana Lima
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

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DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER: The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum was dedicated in Cooperstown, N.Y., on this day in 1939. More than 200 individuals have been honored for their contributions to the game by induction in the hall. The first players chosen for membership were Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, Babe Ruth, Christy Mathewson and Walter Johnson. Relics and memorabilia from the history of baseball are housed at this shrine of America’s national sport.

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COLD WAR COMMAND: President Ronald Reagan gave his “Tear Down this Wall” speech on this day in 1987. Standing at the Brandenburg Gate and the Berlin Wall, Reagan challenged Soviet president Mikhail Gorbachev to give more than lip service to liberalization in the Eastern Bloc. “General Secretary Gorbachev,” he said, “if you seek peace, if you seek prosperity for the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, if you seek liberalization: Come here to this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!” The wall finally came down in 1989.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“No generation can escape history.”

— President George H.W. Bush, who was born on this day in 1924


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