Brooklyn Boro

June 18: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 18, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1927, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Father is to have his innings tomorrow, when ‘Father’s Day’ is to be celebrated for the fifth time throughout the United States. Mother’s Day was accepted without question, but when Mrs. John B. Dodd of Spokane, Wash., proposed Father’s Day in 1910 everybody took it as a joke. Father was considered the wheelhorse of the family who shied at sentiment, but as the years passed and the observance of Father’s Day became more general, the true significance of the day began to sink into the national consciousness and father was honored regularly by his own special day just as mother had been for many years. At first there was confusion in dates as each community chose its own. In 1914 Congress tried to fix the first Sunday in June by a resolution, which did not help much, but in 1920 a concerted movement got under way to settle upon the third Sunday in June as Father’s Day. Red or white roses, cornflowers and dandelions are the flowers usually worn for father. Churches, theaters and organizations will honor father in various ways, with personal gifts marking the day in the family circle. The shops are blossoming out with suggestions to ‘Buy a tie for Dad,’ so at least father will not suffer for new ties even if he does shy at the selections. But in spite of jokes, supposedly brilliant poetry and good-natured gibes, Father’s Day is here as an established custom.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1933, the Eagle reported, “Man does not live on city streets alone. As the warmth of the summer months returns each year, sifting down even among the rock-pile office buildings and apartment houses, there comes upon the city dweller the sudden urge to get away from it all — to leave streets and sidewalks, subways and hotel lobbies behind, and to move out where there is green grass and a cool white beach, mountain ridges or a shimmering, winding stream or the open sea. For civilization has been with us a comparatively brief period and in the most hardened city inhabitant the ancestral nostalgia for a return to nature is not hard to re-arouse. In these depression years, the mental strain brought on by the fight to make both ends meet more than ever makes a vacation in some form of outdoors an almost irresistible lure.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “Four of the 22 newly formed Brooklyn Assembly Districts in the recent borough-wide apportionment by the Democratic-controlled City Council were declared invalid today by Justice George A. Arkwright in Brooklyn Supreme Court. Justice Arkwright, a Republican, ruled that the State Constitution had been ‘grossly and flagrantly violated’ when the council drew the lines for the new 3rd, 4th, 5th and 17th Assembly Districts. He enjoined City Council President Abe Stark and other council leaders from certifying the new lines. The ruling came on a suit by four Brooklynites, representing the Kings County Republican organization, asking Stark and council leaders to show cause why the reapportionment of the four districts should not be declared void, demanding certification of the lines halted and that the City Council be directed to draw new lines. Justice Arkwright, however, refused to grant the last part of the order, saying that he does not have the power to direct the City Council to reconvene and draw new lines. The petitioners charged in argument before the court earlier this week that the four districts, as reapportioned, are not ‘contiguous and compact’ as required by the State Constitution.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “Declaration by the U.S. Supreme Court that recitation of the Lord’s Prayer and bible reading in public schools is unconstitutional drew mixed reactions in Brooklyn as it did throughout the nation yesterday. In a sweeping 8 to 1 decision, the court ruled that such religious exercises violated the first amendment, which prohibits governmental ‘establishment of religion,’ stating that the state must maintain strict ‘neutrality’ between man and the worship of God. Brooklyn and other New York City schools — never having adopted the New York State Regents prayer which was struck down by the Supreme Court last June — will be affected only to the extent that bible reading, required under Board of Education bylaws at the opening of regular weekly school assemblies, will be dropped.”

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Alana de la Garza
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP
Paul McCartney
Amy Harris/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include businessman and politician Brooks Firestone, who was born in 1939; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Paul McCartney, who was born in 1942; “Taxi” star Carol Kane, who was born in 1952; “Blue Velvet” star Isabella Rossellini, who was born in 1952; “Dream On” star Brian Benben, who was born in 1956; Boyz II Men founder Nathan Morris, who was born in 1971; Hockey Hall of Famer and former N.Y. Rangers right wing Martin St. Louis, who was born in 1975; “Law and Order” star Alana de la Garza, who was born in 1976; country music superstar Blake Shelton, who was born in 1976; eight-time Pro Bowl tight end Antonio Gates, who was born in 1980; and former N.Y. Rangers center Derek Stepan, who was born in 1990.

Derek Stepan
Wikimedia Commons

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THE HEAT OF BATTLE: Red Adair was born on this day in 1915. The Houston native began fighting oil well fires after serving in an Army bomb disposal unit during World War II. He founded Red Adair Co. in 1959 and during his career battled more than 2,000 land and offshore oil fires. In his 70s, he took part in extinguishing oil fires in Kuwait that were set by retreating Iraqi troops during the 1991 Gulf War. He died in 2004.

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SPACE FOR EVERYONE: The first American woman went into space on this day in 1983. Dr. Sally Ride, a 32-year-old physicist and pilot, functioned as a mission specialist on a six-day mission aboard the space shuttle Challenger. The near-perfect mission was launched from Cape Canaveral, Florida, and landed at Edwards Air Force Base, California. Ride was inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame in 2007. She died in 2012.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“The stars don’t look bigger, but they do look brighter.”

— astronaut Sally Ride, who went into space on this day in 1983


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