Brooklyn Boro

September 28: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

September 28, 2023 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1913, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “It was a long time coming, but it came at last — on the last day of the season — a winning by the Brooklyn Superbas over the New York Giants in the series of four games with which those two teams ended the interborough strife for 1913. The winning was by 4 to 0, and was largely due to the various deeds of three persons, the same being G. Napoleon Rucker, who held the Giants to four scattered hits; George Cutshaw, who scored three of the four runs, and Zacharia Wheat, who made a home run that was a great help, a double that drove in Cutshaw from second and a single that drove in Cutshaw from third. Cutshaw made another run without the assistance of Z. Wheat, but he was ably abetted in that instance by the walloping of Charley Stengel, whose place Wheat took in the line-up, when Charles was bounced by Umpire Charley Rigler in the first inning for kicking on a decision at the plate. They may be Giants in the National League, and they are Giants, indeed, when playing a team that is off its feed, but the Giants bore a decided resemblance to the well-known shrimp after yesterday’s game. Their shriveling was watched by a crowd of 9,500 paying fans, to say nothing of deadheads, and when the 9,500, who had given up their coin and, therefore, had a moral right to express their opinion, filtered through the gates of Ebbets Field for the last time this year, they were convinced that the Giants will have to do a heap of growing if they expect to beat the Philadelphia Athletics in the World’s series which begins at the Polo Grounds a week from next Tuesday.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1930, the Eagle reported, “When the wind blows 14 miles an hour it is just 5.4 times as cold to the bare skin as still air at the same temperature. Contrary to teachings of some scientists and a popular belief, fur is not warmest with the hair turned inside. Certain clothing actually makes one cooler in still air than none at all. These and other discoveries about warmth of clothing are reported to the American Society for Testing Materials by Ephriam Freedman, director of the bureau of standards of R.H. Macy & Co., according to the Associated Press. They were found with a new kind of robot which looks like an elongated tin can and radiates heat exactly like an unclothed human body. It can be dressed and then made to record the warming properties of its suitings. This robot has bronze skin, and for nerves a wire-thin 400-inch long copper, xylene-filled thermometer, which is wound spirally around the outside of its body. Its insides are an electrical heating apparatus and it records the exact amount of energy, in watts, necessary to maintain its bronze skin at body temperature. It lives in a big box where the temperature ranges from 20 above zero to 90 in the shade.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1938, the Eagle reported, “Work on the $27,900,000 circumferential parkway around Brooklyn and Queens will begin in 60 days, it was said today following an official announcement yesterday by Harold L. Ickes, public works administrator, that the Federal government had approved its $12,000,000 share toward the cost of the project. The parkway is planned to connect with the proposed Brooklyn-Battery tunnel for which Brooklyn industrial interests are waging a determined fight.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “DETROIT (U.P.) — Agreement on a precedent-setting Ford Motor Company contract appeared imminent today as weary negotiators worked around the clock to beat a midnight strike deadline. The marathon talks were reported to center on a company offer of 8¾ cents an hour for pensions under a 2½ year contract, longest in automotive history. Fear of a threatened strike at midnight dimmed as top United Auto Workers and company officials battled against time to reach agreement on ‘assembly line to grave’ pensions for 115,000 Ford workers across the nation. ‘We’re trying to beat the deadline,’ Walter Reuther, U.A.W. president, said after almost continuous talks since 3 p.m. yesterday. With reports of headway from all sides, the auto workers’ leader refused comment on whether he would call out Ford production workers in 49 plants across the nation tomorrow if settlement is not reached. The U.A.W. has had a traditional policy of ‘no contract, no work.’ But the feeling grew that the usually militant U.A.W. chief might delay a strike call beyond the midnight tonight termination of the present contract if he felt sufficient progress was being made. Reuther and chief Ford negotiator John S. Bugas were equally silent about progress of talks, held behind locked doors in a midtown hotel.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “LAKE PLACID, N.Y. — The New York Rangers, encamped in Lake Placid where they are preparing for the National Hockey League campaign which opens for them in two-and-one-half weeks in Montreal, will get their first test of the year tonight when they cross sticks with their American League farmhands, the New Haven Ramblers, in an exhibition game in the Adirondack resort’s Olympic Arena. A raft of new faces will dot the Blue Shirt lineup in tonight’s encounter, which is to serve as a shakedown of the squad. No less than four defensemen — all six feet or taller — and seven forwards are pressing last year’s regulars for berths on the 1949-50 team.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “Eleven league doubleheaders, most ever in Madison Square Garden, highlight the Knickerbockers’ 1954-55 home schedule of 27 games in the National Basketball Association, their ninth campaign in the pro circuit. The Knicks, Eastern Division champions, will play 20 games at the Garden and seven at the 69th Regiment Armory. New Year’s night they face the Milwaukee Hawks with the Harlem Globetrotters opposing the Philadelphia Sphas. Christmas night the Lapchickmen will be hosts to the Syracuse Nationals, who carried the Minneapolis Lakers to seven games in the 1954 title playoffs.”

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Hilary Duff
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP
Janeane Garofalo
Brent N. Clarke/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “And God Created Woman” star Brigitte Bardot, who was born in 1934; “Eight Men Out” director John Sayles, who was born in 1950; “Supreme Courtship” author Christopher Buckley, who was born in 1952; Pro Football Hall of Famer Steve Largent, who was born in 1954; Dokken guitarist George Lynch, who was born in 1954; “Reality Bites” star Janeane Garofalo, who was born in 1964; Oscar-winning actress Mira Sorvino, who was born in 1967; “The Ring” star Naomi Watts, who was born in 1968; former N.Y. Knicks point guard Jose Calderon, who was born in 1981; former NBA player Emeka Okafor, who was born in 1982; “Lizzie McGuire” star Hilary Duff, who was born in 1987; and “The Babysitter” star Hana Mae Lee, who was born in 1988.

Mira Sorvino
Rob Latour/Invision/AP

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“In public relations, you live with the reality that not every disaster can be made to look like a misunderstood triumph.”

— author Christopher Buckley, who was born on this day in 1952


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