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September 27: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

September 27, 2023 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1876, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The naturalization of citizens in this county for the Fall campaign has been begun. The County Court is open daily from 9 to 4 o’clock, and Judge Moore and his clerks turn the naturalization mill. Tonight, Friday night, and every night next month up to the 28th, the County Court will be open from 7 to 9 o’clock. This being a Presidential campaign, there is heavy work ahead for the County Judge and his assistants. It is expected that Kings County will bring out its voters to the last man this time, and the indications are that more aliens will be made citizens than ever before. Sixty-eight of those who presented themselves passed muster last night. This is a fair average for the first night, the General Committees of both parties not being inclined to rush in their men at the start. Last year as high as 700 were made citizens in one night.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1914, the Eagle reported, “How has the European war affected you? In some ways, surely, for though your income might be the same as it was before hostilities were begun, you must bear your share of the general burden by paying increased prices for certain articles. Perhaps you were unlucky enough to have your income reduced and have been driven to the necessity of taking a roomer to help pay your household expenses. A large number of Brooklynites have taken this step ‘to make ends meet.’ Socially and commercially the effects of the war are widespread. Plans for raising funds for charitable purposes have been temporarily laid aside. Even the churches are feeling the results of the great conflict. One congregation finds that it can build an addition now cheaper than it could a short time ago, as building materials and labor cost less than they did. Another church, because of the general reduction, is giving up part of its musical talent. Foreign mission societies are particularly active, bending their efforts toward measures for relief of the more acute sufferers from the war … Commercially, the effects are two-fold; the first being the cutting off of our imports, and the second the opportunity offered for expansion beyond the seas. Businessmen in Brooklyn feel that we will be able to replace most, if not all, of the articles we have been importing by similar articles made in this country. American enterprise and ingenuity, it is thought, will produce anything that the old world has been able to send us, and while it may take some little time to accomplish this, there is a firm conviction that ultimately we will be able to overcome any elimination of exports which may follow.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Eagle reported, “Secretary of the Treasury [David F.] Houston says that the high prices being asked for shoes have no terrors for him. He believes he can get by with the shoes he owns now until there is a reduction. The Secretary today had on a pair of shoes that he has worn for three years. They are still in fairly good shape and may take another half soling, which will be their third. The Secretary was asked how he was able to wear shoes for a period of three years. ‘Simply wear them out,’ he replied, ‘then have them resoled. Then maybe their life can be further lengthened by a few patches. I won’t pay sky-high prices for shoes. If everybody would follow this cue, shoe prices would tumble and mighty quickly.’ Further proof that the Secretary practices the economy he preaches so assiduously was observed in the neatly pressed suit of clothes he wore. He confessed that it had been many winters since he had bought a new suit. ‘I may yet rival Secretary [Josephus] Daniels,’ he said, ‘in the distinction of sporting a pair of patched trousers.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1926, the Eagle reported, “PROVIDENCE, R.I. — Although defeated here yesterday in their opening game of the season by the Providence Steam Rollers, 13 to 0, the Brooklyn Lions of the National Football League demonstrated that they have a well-balanced club that needs only a little more polish to make it a strong contender for the pennant. The home eleven was in much better physical condition, due to two previous games, and was picked to win by a larger score. In one sense of the word it was a moral victory for the invaders.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1928, Eagle columnist Frederick Boyd Stevenson said, “In Cleveland, Ohio, to the American Electric Railway Association attendants, Roy J. Wensley gave a private exhibition of the ‘Televox,’ a mechanical man with the power to speak. It was stated that this mechanical man might take the place of conductors and drivers in the subways and on the trolley cars of the future. And let us hope that this mechanical conductor will speak plainer than some of the boys now holding down those jobs, and also that the drivers will make better time than the boys running the subway trains.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “Enthusiastic confidence that the present box-office upswing will be maintained and undoubtedly was expressed by Barney Balaban, president of Paramount Pictures, on his return to New York after a two-week stay at the company’s Hollywood studio. Mr. Balaban’s optimistic outlook was based on a series of intensive conferences held with Y. Frank Freeman, vice-president and studio head, Don Hartman, in charge of production, and other studio executives, and on screenings of the upcoming Paramount product. With the public strongly demonstrating the desire to increase its pattern of frequent and regular attendance at motion picture theaters, he said, Paramount and the other production companies ‘today, more than ever before in the history of the motion pictures, are responding with a type of screen entertainment specifically designed to meet the tastes and demands of the public. All of this indicates a very healthy situation and outlook for the motion picture industry.’”

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Lil Wayne
Owen Sweeney/Invision/AP
Avril Lavigne
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Oscar-winning actor Claude Jarman Jr., who was born in 1934; Bachman-Turner Overdrive co-founder Randy Bachman, who was born in 1943; “Star Wars” actor Denis Lawson, who was born in 1947; “The John Larroquette Show” star Liz Torres, who was born in 1947; “The Lone Gunmen” star Tom Braidwood, who was born in 1948; Baseball Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt, who was born in 1949; former Marvel Comics editor-in-chief Jim Shooter, who was born in 1951; Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr, who was born in 1965; Space Shuttle astronaut Stephanie Wilson, who was born in 1966; Oscar-winning actress Gwyneth Paltrow, who was born in 1972; rapper Lil Wayne, who was born in 1982; “Complicated” singer Avril Lavigne, who was born in 1984; tennis player and Olympic gold medalist Monica Puig, who was born in 1993; and “The Fallout” star Jenna Ortega, who was born in 2002.

Gwyneth Paltrow
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“No people will tamely surrender their liberties, nor can any be easily subdued, when knowledge is diffused and virtue is preserved.”

— U.S. founding father Samuel Adams, who was born on this day in 1722


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