Brooklyn Boro

September 21: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

September 21, 2023 Brooklyn Eagle History
Share this:

ON THIS DAY IN 1871, a Brooklyn Daily Eagle editorial said, “While men are making what is non-euphoniously called a ‘muddle’ of politics, society, and all the interests included in the comprehensive term ‘human affairs,’ the seasons calmly accomplish their work with customary regularity, and offer impressive proof of the satisfactory results of strict attention to business. The Spring time of planting, the Summer of growth, and the Autumnal harvest period follow in faithful order, performing each its beneficent function with absolute reliability, despite municipal frauds in New York or war-making in Europe. But for this seasonable regularity the recuperation of a heavily taxed public plundered by its employees, or a people stricken by a terrible discipline of fire and blood, would be impossible. If the seasons were as capricious and conscienceless as men often are, the race would be swept from the face of the earth; but, by a benignly inevitable routine, the revolving year repairs reckless human waste.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1900, the Eagle reported, “Most satisfactory assurances were furnished yesterday by the Rapid Transit Commissioners of their intention to extend the underground to this borough at the earliest possible date. The question of the Brooklyn extension was the chief topic discussed at the meeting, and while no action was taken, practical agreement was arrived at regarding its vital features. After the meeting, Controller [Bird Sim] Coler said a definite proposition would probably be laid before the board next Thursday, providing for a tunnel along Broadway down to Whitehall street and thence to the river and over to Brooklyn at the foot of Joralemon street, whence it will run to the City Hall and up Fulton street to Flatbush avenue. This is the plan advocated by the Committee of Fifty, who were represented at several hearings given early in the summer. The majority of the members of the commission approve this plan as the one likely to give the greatest measure of relief to Brooklyn both in the immediate future and later on.”

***

DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

ON THIS DAY IN 1919, the Eagle reported, “PITTSBURGH, SEPT. 20 — The eve of the Nation-wide strike in the steel industry finds both sides in the contest apparently prepared for the battle. Final arrangements were rushed today, the corporations paying much attention to plans for guarding their property and the union leaders continuing their intensive campaign to unionize unorganized men and urging others to stand by the workers. Tonight there seemed to be nothing to do but wait for the test of strength on Monday when the strike will officially begin. Expressing confidence that the unions have not the power to compel a general shutdown, officials of the United States Steel Corporation, the main object of the attack of Labor, and of other steel companies said they will blow their whistles as usual Monday morning and try to operate their plants. They frankly admit they will do their best, and if sufficient men do not report, which they do not concede, they will shut down until such time as they can command enough men to make it worthwhile to start up again.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1930, the Eagle reported, “With a robot to greet them, apparatus to translate their voices into visible waves and programs being broadcast from twin crystal studios for them to watch, visitors to the seventh annual radio world’s fair at Madison Square Garden beginning tomorrow will be regaled with the marvels of the nation’s greatest radio laboratories. Not only will there be displays of all the latest models of radio receivers and accessories, but there will be on display groups of devices, some of which are being shown for the first time, in exhibits sponsored by the Science Forum of New York and the Museum of Peaceful Arts. A robot will vocally greet each visitor who approaches the exhibit. Another mechanical man will automatically count everyone looking at the display. Newly developed tubes will perform surprising tasks. Radio waves will be made visible. Persons will talk into a microphone and watch the fluctuations caused by their voices. As the visitors approach this group of exhibits, a robot in a suit of ancient armor will utter a loud vocal greeting to each person passing a tiny beam of light. The robot’s voice is clear and distinct. This exhibit offers contrast in the fact that one of the latest robot creations will be encased in the armor of many centuries ago.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “The Brooklyn Dodgers died last night at home after a lingering illness. The score was 7-1. Some 26,900 friends and relations were at the bedside when the 1953 National League champions expired. The New York Giants, 1954 champions, will conduct a post-mortem at Ebbets Field at 1:30 p.m. today. World Series services marking the joint demise of the New York Yankees and our Dodgers will begin next Wednesday at the Polo Grounds. The Dodgers’ end came not without warning and there was little suffering on the part of the Flock and the Faithful.”

***

Bill Murray
Scott Roth/Invision/AP
Stephen King
Peter Kramer/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include 1988 NBA Coach of the Year Doug Moe, who was born in Brooklyn in 1938; film and TV producer Jerry Bruckheimer, who was born in 1943; actress and author Fannie Flagg, who was born in 1944; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Don Felder (the Eagles), who was born in 1947; “Doctor Sleep” author Stephen King, who was born in 1947; Basketball Hall of Famer Artis Gilmore, who was born in 1949; “Ghostbusters” star Bill Murray, who was born in 1950; “Friends” co-creator Marta Kauffman, who was born in 1956; Oscar-winning filmmaker Ethan Coen, who was born in 1957; “Full House” star Dave Coulier, who was born in 1959; “Last Man Standing” star Nancy Travis, who was born in 1961; former N.Y. Yankees first baseman Cecil Fielder, who was born in 1963; “Curb Your Enthusiasm” star Cheryl Hines, who was born in 1965; TV personality Nicole Richie, who was born in 1981; “Lost” star Maggie Grace, who was born in 1983; and “The Walking Dead” star Christian Serratos, who was born in 1990.

Nicole Richie
Matt Sayles/AP

***

Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“I always want to say to people who want to be rich and famous: ‘Try being rich first. See if that doesn’t cover most of it.”’

— actor Bill Murray, who was born on this day in 1950


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment