Brooklyn Boro

September 25: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

September 25, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Babe Ruth made his 50th home run of the 1920 American League season yesterday in the first half of a doubleheader when Washington beat New York, and his 51st homer in the second game, which was won by New York. The split about put the Yankees out of the running for good and all.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1929, the Eagle reported, “Millions of dollars of paper profits were again wiped out and many cash losses sustained in the stock market today. Leading stocks dropped from 2 to 20 points, with many stable issues down 5 points or more. Trading was at a furious pace, with the ticker 20 minutes or more behind the trading on the floor. Brokerage houses were filled with anxious speculators, and downtown telephone exchanges were swamped with calls. The heaviest part of the reaction came at midday, following an increase in the call money rate to 9 percent from a renewal figure at 8. Stocks up to that time had fared quite well, with some up a little. The selling in the early afternoon suggested in part a further bear raid, but also some forced liquidation by speculators who were unable to meet the margin calls of their brokers. Prices tended to rally a little in the later part of the trading, following further advance of the call money rate to 10 percent.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1942, the Eagle reported, “Thomas E. Dewey, Republican candidate for governor, held the solution today to the new wartime problem of attempting to campaign by automobile under restricted speed limits without losing votes. The Dewey formula, demonstrated for the first time in Brooklyn, is to drive in strict compliance with the 20-mile-an-hour night speed limitation, reduce speechmaking to a minimum and break all records for cordial handshaking with admiring supporters. The Republican candidate turned the trick in his first automobile campaign tour of Brooklyn last night when he visited four more or less widely separated GOP clubhouses, spoke at each and gave a personal handclasp to members of his audiences consisting of an estimated total of more than 1,000 persons. Republican stalwarts, scenting the chance of a GOP victory in the state on Nov. 3, party leaders, rank-and-file workers, youthful autograph seekers and a group of rabbis were among those greeting the gubernatorial candidate.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “PARIS (U.P.) — Russia accused the United States today of preparing an atomic war against the Soviet Union and simultaneously appealed to the United Nations for a one-third reduction in world armaments. The charge and appeal were made before the U.N. General Assembly by Soviet chief delegate Andrei Vishinsky in a slashing one-hour statement of Soviet policy. Military leaders in the United States already have prepared plans for the atomic destruction of such Soviet cities as Moscow, Leningrad, Kiev, Kharkov and Odessa, Vishinsky charged. He proposed that the United Nations outlaw the atomic bomb and call upon the Big Five powers to reduce their armed forces by one-third during the course of one year.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1951, the Eagle reported, “LONDON (U.P.) — King George VI’s pulse beat was stronger today, but Buckingham Palace officials said his life will be in danger for at least another week. The fifth palace bulletin since the frail monarch underwent a major lung operation Sunday announced at 11 a.m.: ‘After another restful night, the King continues to gain strength.’ … Despite the apparent turn for the better in the King’s condition, he probably will not be able to resume his state duties until some time next year. He is expected to be a semi-invalid for months to come. There was discussion in some quarters of the possibility of designating 25-year-old Princess Elizabeth, heiress to the throne, as regent to act for her father. However, court authorities said a regency could be established only if the King became insane — as did George III — or if he were a minor.”

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Catherine Zeta-Jones
Richard Drew/AP
Will Smith
Peter Kramer/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include journalist and TV personality Barbara Walters, who was born in 1929; Basketball Hall of Famer Hubie Brown, who was born in 1933; Oscar-winning actor Michael Douglas, who was born in 1944; model and actress Cheryl Tiegs, who was born in 1947; “Star Wars” star Mark Hamill, who was born in 1951; Basketball Hall of Famer Bob McAdoo, who was born in 1951; “Dynasty” star Heather Locklear, who was born in 1961; “The Sopranos” star Aida Turturro, who was born in Brooklyn in 1962; “Damages” star Tate Donovan, who was born in 1963; Basketball Hall of Famer Scottie Pippen, who was born in 1965; “I Am Legend” star Will Smith, who was born in 1968; Oscar-winning actress Catherine Zeta-Jones, who was born in 1969; former NFL quarterback Matt Hasselbeck, who was born in 1975; and actor and musician Donald Glover, who was born in 1983.

Michael Douglas
Chris Pizzello/AP

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BREAKING NEWS: The first American newspaper was published on this day in 1690. The first (and only) edition of Publick Occurrences Both Foreign and Domestick was published by Benjamin Harris at the London-Coffee-House in Boston. Authorities considered the paper offensive and ordered its immediate suppression.

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WOMAN OF THE YEAR: Sandra Day O’Connor was sworn in as the first woman associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court on this day in 1981. She was nominated by President Ronald Reagan – who promised during his 1980 campaign that he would appoint a woman to the court – and the Senate confirmed her by a vote of 99-0. She retired in 2006 and was succeeded by Justice Samuel Alito.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“I have affected the way women are regarded, and that’s important to me.”

— journalist Barbara Walters, who was born on this day in 1929


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