Brooklyn Boro

June 15: ON THIS DAY in 1904, 300 lives may be lost in East River excursion disaster

June 15, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

d and taken at the gang plank for the excursion of St. Mark’s Evangelical Lutheran Church of East Sixth street, Manhattan, to Locust Grove, on the Sound. Each adult ticket probably represented three or four persons. Parents were permitted to take children from the classes free on the purchase of an adult ticket, and in many cases, each ticket sold meant that three or four persons were passed on it.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — American Super-Fortress B-29 bombers attacked Japan proper today in what Gen. George C. Marshall hailed as the opening step in a new-type of offensive against the Japanese. The raid on the enemy’s homeland — the first carried out by American airmen since the epic Doolittle raid of 1942 — was announced by the War Department in a brief statement which gave no details but said only: ‘B-29 Super-Fortresses of the United States Army Air Forces 20th Bomber Command bombed Japan today.’ This first announced raid by the new B-29’s came at a time when United States forces were pushing back the enemy throughout the Pacific. Only today the Japanese radio reported that American forces had landed in the Marianas Islands — only 1,500 miles from Japan, and a doorstep to American re-entry into the Philippines. The Super-Fortresses hit Japan from distant bases somewhere in the China-Burma-India theater, the War Department disclosed.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “OYSTER BAY (U.P.) — Sagamore Hill, President Theodore Roosevelt’s ornate, trophy-filled mansion, stood open to the public today as a national shrine. President Eisenhower formally dedicated the 83-acre estate and its famous old red brick house yesterday while 10,000 Flag Day celebrators made a picnic of the occasion. Eisenhower also proclaimed this week ‘Theodore Roosevelt Week’ in memory of the 26th president. The crowd celebrated in turn-of-the-century style on the grounds of the estate which ‘T.R.’ used as a summer White House during his term as president from 1901 to 1909. Refreshment stands under gaily striped canopies did a brisk business to the accompaniment of two brass bands. The 23-room house, built in 1884 and recently restored at a cost of $500,000, boasts a collection of mounted animals, military souvenirs and other relics collected by the adventurous president. Official welcomers for President Eisenhower included Mrs. Richard Derby and Mrs. Alice Roosevelt Longworth, daughters of Theodore Roosevelt, and Archibald B. Roosevelt, his only surviving son … Eisenhower praised Roosevelt as ‘not only a great moral leader but a great solider,’ and for his ‘stamina, courage and persistence’ in carrying through his programs.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “A contingent of Hollywood stars, led by Troy Donohue, Connie Stevens, Ty Hardin and Diane McBain, will arrive in Boston next Tuesday to be among the honored guests the following evening at the gala world premiere of ‘PT 109,’ the Warner Bros. motion picture about President John F. Kennedy’s adventures as a Navy lieutenant in the South Pacific in World War II. The premiere will take place at Loew’s Orpheum Theatre, with proceeds benefiting leading charities of all faiths. Richard Cardinal Cushing is serving as chairman of the premiere committee.”


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