Brooklyn Boro

October 21: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

October 21, 2023 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1845, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “A Great Match at Base Ball. — This afternoon, at 2 o’clock, the New York Base Ball Club play a match at ball with the Brooklyn Club at the Elysian Fields, Hoboken. The interest attached to this match will attract large numbers from this and the neighboring city.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1906, Eagle columnist Frederick Boyd Stevenson said, “When one swings around the circle with William Randolph Hearst, one gets action. A man may be for Hearst or he may be against Hearst. A man may laud Hearst as the candidate militant for God and country, or he may lambaste Hearst as a perambulating garage for all the pernicious principles that threaten the body politic and the civic — but one thing all men must admit: Hearst keeps busy. During his ten-days whirl through the rural districts of the state, when visits were made to villages, country towns and cities, there was scarcely an idle moment on the two private cars of the Hearst campaigning party outside of the time spent in eating and sleeping. What with making statements en route on all the new issues of the campaign that were daily arising, what with blocking out and dictating his speeches on board the train as he was rushed from railway station to railway station across country, and what with delivering the speeches — sometimes five a day — and appearing on the platform of his car to be snap-shot by bucolic camera fiends and quizzed by embryonic Horace Greeleys, and, moreover, what with receiving delegations from Democratic county committees and Independence Leaguers, and having his hand shaken till the tears came into his eyes, there was enough to do to satisfy the most ambitious campaigner that ever marched behind the band or made a cart-tail oration to the cheering multitudes. Hearst on a campaign is like a Hearst afternoon newspaper — there is a new edition every fifteen minutes, with extras in between editions.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1930, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (AP) — The opinion of organized American Jewry was recorded today in condemnation of the latest British declaration of policy in regard to Palestine administration. The American Jewish Congress, which originally supported the mandate from the League of Nations under which Great Britain assumed rule over Palestine, saw in yesterday’s report of Sir John Hope Simpson on Palestine immigration, land settlement and development, a serious blow to the establishment of a national home for the Jewish people. In a resolution, it termed the government’s statement, made public in London with the report, a ‘repudiation of the solemn pledge given by the British Government to the Jewish people.’ It was adopted at the closing session of the congress here, together with expressions on behalf of oppressed Jews in Russia, Rumania and Poland. A meeting of the administrative committee was ordered to take whatever action it may on the Palestine situation. The congress elected Rabbi Stephen S. Wise of New York as honorary president and Bernard S. Deutsch of New York, president. The Palestine resolution recalled the severe criticism of British administration of the mandate recently expressed by the permanent mandates commission of the League of Nations. It termed the Simpson report ‘biased and contrary to the terms and spirit’ of the mandate, and contrasted the present British position with assurances sent the United States Government in December, 1921, that establishment of a national home for the Jewish people in Palestine was the ‘principal concern and interest’ of Great Britain.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1930, the Eagle reported, “The Rangers and the Americans are going to start getting ready tomorrow to go to the cleaners. Each of the local hockey clubs expects to take any number of rival players on the same journey. Going to the cleaners, in the parlance of the game, means rough work in the corners and out on center ice, too. It’s always rough work when the National Hockey League is playing through its schedule. Armistice Day, three weeks hence, sees the start of the season, and the fancy of the hockey bug lightly turns to thoughts of hickory sticks, high and low, forwards caught in the deadly sandwich by rugged defense ruffians, goalies crouching in their stuffed uniforms, black rubber flying, red goal lights blazing, referee and gallery whistling.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “TEHRAN (U.P.) — Iran’s lower house of parliament today overwhelmingly ratified an agreement that will permit eight foreign companies to put the nation’s oil on the world market again. Deputies in the Majlis (house) voted 113 to 5, with two abstaining, in favor of the accord which ends a dispute that began in 1951 when Mohammed Mossadegh, the premier, expropriated the vast Anglo-Iranian Oil Company.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — The government is thinking about developing a special new family of atomic weapons to guard North America against bomber attacks, responsible sources said today. Such weapons, when and if perfected, would be expected to reduce drastically the number of enemy bombers that could penetrate outlying continental defenses and cut through to vital targets. Sources said decisions are expected during the next six months on whether to proceed with the development of atomic warheads for anti-aircraft guided missiles launched from the ground and possibly for missiles launched from jet interceptor planes.”

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Kim Kardashian
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP
Judge Judy
Evan Agostini/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “The Honeymooners” star Joyce Randolph, who was born in 1924; guitarist and singer Manfred Mann, who was born in 1940; U.S. Hockey Hall of Famer and N.Y Islanders general manager Lou Lamoriello, who was born in 1942; judge and TV host Judge Judy Sheindlin, who was born in Brooklyn in 1942; former N.Y. Rangers coach Mike Keenan, who was born in 1949; Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who was born in 1949; Go-Go’s guitarist Charlotte Caffey, who was born in 1953; Toto co-founder Steve Lukather, who was born in 1957; former N.Y. Jets linebacker Mo Lewis, who was born in 1969; “Growing Pains” star Jeremy Miller, who was born in 1976; TV personality Kim Kardashian, who was born in 1980; Kansas City Royals pitcher Zack Greinke, who was born in 1983; and Cleveland Cavaliers point guard Ricky Rubio, who was born in 1990.

Joyce Randolph
Evan Agostini/AP

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Resentment is like drinking poison and waiting for the other person to die.”

— actress and author Carrie Fisher, who was born on this day in 1956


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