Brooklyn Boro

August 29: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

August 29, 2023 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1854, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Hook and Ladder Truck No. 1 — This Company brought home their new truck yesterday, and safely ensconced her in Firemen’s Hall, Henry street. The apparatus is painted red, and ornamented with the figures of eagles which are placed on each side, above the wheels, giving the whole a fine appearance. The Company, which turned out in full numbers, was accompanied by the Brooklyn Band, and in the evening all hands and invited guests made themselves merry at a table spread with seasonable viands and exhilarating fluids. They had a good time. May they have many such.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1883, the Eagle reported, “An island inhabited by some millions of people and studded with volcanoes suddenly became the theater of the most extraordinary manifestation of those activities for which science is able to give but a poor explanation. Some time ago a small volcanic island a few miles off the coast and containing a volcano was observed to be in a state of excitement. This was not an unusual occurrence, it appears, and though the wonderful phenomena were watched with intense interest, no especial alarm was felt in the main island. The glow and detonations on Krakatoa were distinctly perceptible forty-five miles distant, and a few hours later a shower of red hot rocks and ashes began to fall. The deposit increased for several hours; the water which separates the two islands was observed to be in a state of profound agitation, literally boiling or approaching that state. The bed of the strait was undoubtedly heated to a tremendous temperature, sharing the condition of Krakatoa. For 500 miles round the sea gave evidences of similar disturbances. But the sinister energy at work was traveling steadily toward Java carrying death and devastation with it.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1911, the Eagle reported, “BERNE, SWITZERLAND — Tourists while crossing the Loetschen glacier yesterday saw deep down in the clear ice the faces of two dead men. Guides accompanying the party chipped out with their ice axes the frozen bodies of the two men and brought them to the surface. The bodies have not yet been identified, but they probably are those of two London tourists named Bemebecke and Coin, who disappeared fourteen years ago.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Eagle reported, “With the arrival in the Port of New York during the week ending yesterday of 18,691 aliens, all immigration records since long before the war were broken. Inspection of steerage passengers at Ellis Island from last Sunday up to and including yesterday numbered 12,838. Added to these were 2,600 cabin passenger aliens, making a total of 15,438 incoming aliens who have been inspected. More than 1,800 steerage passengers who came on the steamship Providence from Italy and 1,056 steerage and 397 second cabin passengers from the Baltic are yet to be inspected. These run the total arrival of aliens during the week to 18,691. A full force of inspectors will work all day today in an effort to pass the 3,253 from the Providence and the Baltic through the immigrant gates at Ellis Island.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1925, Eagle sportswriter Tommy Holmes said, “When the lads with the pencils and the copy paper went to work this spring, the consensus appeared to favor the Yankees of Miller Huggins to win another American League flag. As matters stood at that time, the selection appeared logical enough. The same consensus favored the Boston Braves to wind up the National League pennant race in eighth place or lower. This also seemed logical enough. Subsequent events seem to have proved that it not only seemed but was logical. At the present moment the Braves repose tranquilly in the National League cellar. But the prediction regarding the Yankees proved not so good. The athletes of Mr. Huggins have been taking it on the chin ever since April 15, and are almost as far away from the American League pennant as they possibly could be. Only the Red Sox of Boston — one of the worst big league ball clubs in the history of the world — stand between the Yankees and a fall clear through the bottom of the league.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1935, the Eagle reported “KUSSNACHT, SWITZERLAND (A.P.) — Astrid, 29-year-old Queen of the Belgians, was fatally injured today when the automobile her husband, King Leopold, was driving swerved off a country road and hit a tree. She died within five minutes in her King’s arms and with his lips on hers. The King was only slightly injured. The couple’s chauffeur, who was riding in the rear seat while his master drove, suffered broken legs and possible internal injuries. Physicians said he might die. King Leopold told members of his entourage after the accident: ‘I leaned over to look at the map (which the Queen was holding). It lasted only a second and when I looked again at the road, the car was almost on top of a tree.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “LONDON (U.P.) — The social iron curtain which has barred the Duchess of Windsor from high rank in British society since her marriage a decade ago will be in operation again for the wedding of Princess Elizabeth. The Baltimore-born duchess will not be invited to the wedding, according to palace sources. The Duke of Windsor will — but won’t accept because he refuses to attend any royal function without his wife. Thus the Duke of Windsor will miss the marriage of his favorite niece because 80-year-old Queen Mother Mary still finds it impossible to forgive the American divorcee for whose love he abdicated.”

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Neil Gorsuch
J. Scott Applewhite/AP
Lea Michele
Jason Mendez/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “M*A*S*H” star Elliott Gould, who was born in Brooklyn in 1938; Olympic gold medal-winning sprinter Wyomia Tyus, who was born in 1945; Olympic gold-medal winning track and field athlete Bob Beamon, who was born in 1946; animal behaviorist Temple Grandin, who was born in 1947; former Treasury Secretary Jack Lew, who was born in 1955; Hall of Fame jockey Jerry Bailey, who was born in 1957; “Risky Business” star Rebecca De Mornay, who was born in 1959; guitarist wizard Tony MacAlpine, who was born in 1960; former N.Y. Giants linebacker Carl Banks, who was born in 1962; “Girlfriend” singer Pebbles, who was born in 1964; U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch, who was born in 1967; “Spy Kids” star Carla Gugino, who was born in 1971; “Glee” star Lea Michele, who was born in 1986; former N.Y. Mets pitcher Noah Syndergaard, who was born in 1992; and “Strip That Down” singer Liam Payne, who was born in 1993.

Carl Banks
Kathy Willens/AP

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“What worries you, masters you.”

— philosopher John Locke, who was born on this day in 1632


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