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March 21: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

March 21, 2023 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1915, Brooklyn Daily Eagle columnist Frederick Boyd Stevenson wrote, “From the day when the first court held its session it has been the unwritten prerogative of the defeated litigant to go out back of the courthouse and ‘cuss’ the judge who rendered the adverse decision. On a recent occasion, while sitting in one of the courtrooms in Brooklyn, I heard and saw this prerogative stretched several points. The plaintiff in a certain action was denied a motion, and when the presiding justice, with all the majesty of the law announced his decision, the chagrined litigant, instead of accepting it with deferential fortitude, strode down the aisle toward the exit with red face, ejaculating in a tone audible in all parts of the room: ‘This is a hell of a court!’ Of late years there seems to be a tendency on the part of certain ordinarily fair-minded and level-headed citizens to be imbued with practically the same sentiment, although framed in a choicer mode of expression, toward the judiciary system in general throughout the United States. Nothing would be gained by seeking to disguise the fact that there has been an undercurrent of criticism and, in some instances, an upper current of criticism, against the courts of this country. In some cases it may be deserved. In many cases it is not deserved. One of the paramount factors which gives strength to this criticism is the delay of the courts.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1933, the Eagle reported, “A flood of orders for new uniforms of all kinds, especially police, has poured into the offices of the Smith Gray Corporation, 740 Broadway, Manhattan, since the bank holiday restrictions were lifted. ‘We had an increase of over 300 percent in orders for new police uniforms in the last three days of last week,’ Edward S. Smith, president, declared. ‘Orders for other descriptions of uniforms, for chauffeurs, trainmen, elevator operators and so forth, have increased from 50 to 75 percent.’ In addition to actual orders placed, Mr. Smith stated the company has received a great many inquiries which are expected to develop into orders shortly. This unusual influx of business is ascribed by Mr. Smith to the wave of confidence which appears to be sweeping the country. ‘I know of no special reason why business should pick up at this time, excepting that uniformed employees, like everyone else, are definitely more confident in the future of business,’ Mr. Smith declared. ‘They have been out of the markets because they didn’t know what was going to happen next. They have been playing safe. Now, I feel, they think the worst is over and they are buying while prices are still attractively low.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “STOCKHOLM (U.P.) — An advertisement implying that Princess Elizabeth indorsed a $7 imitation pearl necklace was banished from the Swedish Press today. The short-lived ad prompted a diplomatic protest by the British Ambassador, Sir Harold Farquhar, and threatened for a time to impair the good relations between Sweden and Britain. It appeared Sunday in three of Sweden’s biggest papers with a combined circulation of about 600,000. It showed a double strand imitation pearl necklace named the ‘Princess Elizabeth,’ and selling for 35 kroner, or $7. In the ad was a picture of the future Queen and her son, Prince Charles. Around her neck was a strand of pearls that looked like the ‘Princess Elizabeth’ item being offered by a mail order firm. Actually, the pearls which Elizabeth customarily wears for gala occasions are valued at about $20,000. ‘Get your Princess Elizabeth today,’ the ad said. ‘Wear them eight days and return them if not satisfied. Otherwise keep them and pay five kroner (almost $1) a month.’ When Sir Harold saw the ad, he went into action. He made a personal call yesterday at the Swedish Foreign Office. He demanded assurance that ‘under no circumstance will the advertisement be printed again.’ The Swedish Newspaper Publishers’ Association announced today that it had ruled that the ad never appear again in Swedish newspapers.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “FORT LAUDERDALE, FLA. (UPI) — The New York Yankees broke out of their batting slump with a vengeance yesterday, blasting a total of 27 hits to defeat the Washington Senators, 18-3. It was the fourth victory of the Grapefruit League season for the World Champions. The slugfest included home runs by Joe Pepitone and Roger Maris. Both blows came in the fourth inning at the expense of Bennie Daniels, the starting and losing pitcher.”

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Shawon Dunston
Ben Margot/AP
Matthew Broderick
Andy Kropa/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Pro Football Hall of Famer Tom Flores, who was born in 1937; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Rose Stone (Sly and the Family Stone), who was born in 1945; “License to Kill” star Timothy Dalton, who was born in 1946; Supertramp co-founder Roger Hodgson, who was born in 1950; The Stylistics singer Russell Thompkins Jr., who was born in 1951; former “Saturday Night Live” star Brad Hall, who was born in 1958; Oscar-winning actor Gary Oldman, who was born in 1958; Stray Cats drummer Slim Jim Phantom, who was born in Brooklyn in 1961; “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” star Matthew Broderick, who was born in 1962; TV personality Rosie O’Donnell, who was born in 1962; former N.Y. Mets shortstop Shawon Dunston, who was born in Brooklyn in 1963; writer and political commentator Jonah Goldberg, who was born in 1969; former MTV veejay Ananda Lewis, who was born in 1973; rapper and record producer Large Professor, who was born in 1972; former N.Y Rangers captain Ryan Callahan, who was born in 1985; and “Henry Danger” star Jace Norman, who was born in 2000.

Gary Oldman
Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

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FOUNDER’S DAY: Francis Lewis was born in Wales on this day in 1713. Lewis represented New York in the Continental Congress and was one of the oldest signers of the Declaration of Independence. He died in 1802. Francis Lewis Boulevard, which stretches across much of Queens, is named for him, as are two schools, a park and a Masonic lodge.

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THE SKY’S THE LIMIT: The first round-the-world balloon flight ended on this day in 1999 when Swiss psychiatrist Bertrand Piccard and British copilot Brian Jones landed in the Egyptian desert having flown 29,056 miles nonstop. The trip took 19 days, 21 hours and 55 minutes. Piccard is the grandson of Auguste Piccard, who was the first person to ascend into the stratosphere in a balloon.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“I just want the money and the fame and the adoration, and I don’t want any of the other stuff.”

— actor Matthew Broderick, who was born on this day in 1962


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