Brooklyn Boro

December 9: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

December 9, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1941, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “New York City, and the entire Northeast Coast, today had its first air raid alarm. New Yorkers found themselves in the midst of what they had heard about in reports from Europe and Asia, more recently the Pacific Islands and the West Coast. Enemy planes were approaching Long Island — from New England and then from off the Virginia coast. Bombers, apparently, were heading for the Brooklyn Navy Yard, for Mitchel Field and other points. Reports were confusing, but the defense organizations, in view of what had happened in Hawaii, were taking no chances. Interceptor planes took to the air from Mitchel Field to seek out the enemy. Air raid sirens were sounded. Schools were closed. Employees were sent home. Police warned pedestrians to keep off crowded streets. At 1:45 p.m., the police sounded the all-clear signal and a minute later the Fire Department followed suit. But at 2 p.m. the air-raid alarm was renewed by both departments, a minute apart. Police announced the second all-clear at 2:41 p.m.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle reported, “Rail service was rapidly approaching normal, lighting curbs were off, heat was on in the subways and it looked like a bright Christmas for the city today, but the effects of the 17-day coal strike on industrial life and the pocketbooks of some workers appeared likely to continue well past the holiday. All except two major railroads serving the city were near full passenger operation, and most had long freight trains rolling again, but the speed with which they could bring raw and prefabricated materials into town and get thousands of laid-off workers back on their jobs was a doubtful matter. Reports from steel manufacturing centers indicated up to a month might be required to get production up to prestrike levels, and depleted stockpiles of raw material in the city indicated comparatively few of the furloughed employees can be called back to work in the next week or two. Republic Aviation Corporation at Farmingdale announced, for example, it might not be able to recall its 4,000 idled employees for at least two more weeks because of shortages of supplies. Other industrial firms indicated a similar situation.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “President Truman’s election was the biggest news story of 1948, in the opinion of editors around the world. It appeared as one of the year’s ‘ten biggest’ on lists from every section of the world in the United Press’ annual survey of newsworthy events. It led many foreign lists. The struggle at Berlin and other developments in the European cold war also rated high on all lists. United Press news executives in New York chose the year’s ten biggest stories from the standpoint of Americans. Their unanimous choice for first place was Mr. Truman’s victory over Gov. Thomas E. Dewey. This list follows. 1. The election of President Truman; 2. The Berlin airlift and the cold war in Europe; 3. The high cost of living; 4. Mrs. Kasenkina’s escape from the Russian Consulate; 5. Gandhi’s assassination; 6. Death of Babe Ruth; 7. The Chinese civil war; 8. U.S. spy investigations; 9. The founding of Israel and Count Bernadotte’s assassination; 10. Princess Elizabeth’s baby.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1951, the Eagle reported, “An angered Lou Boudreau, ‘sick and tired of all this trade talk,’ officially yanked Ted Williams off the block yesterday and promised that the star outfielder ‘definitely will be with the Boston Red Sox in 1952.’ Obviously irked by recurrent reports that Williams is on the verge of being peddled, Boudreau, the color mounting in his face, suddenly flared: ‘We’re definitely taking Williams off the market. What’s more, we’re just plain sick and tired of all this trade talk that says he’s headed here today and there tomorrow.’ Boudreau also put an end to speculation that the champion New York Yankees would get Williams in the event Joe DiMaggio announces his retirement at a specially called press conference Tuesday. When the possibility was broached, Boudreau, perched on a desk in a hotel where the major league baseball meetings are being held, vehemently declared: ‘I don’t care anything about Joe DiMaggio. That’s the Yankees’ problem. He has absolutely nothing to do with Williams.’”

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McKayla Maroney
Bebeto Matthews/AP
Kirsten Gillibrand
Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Oscar-winning actress Judi Dench, who was born in 1934; “Stargate SG-1” star Beau Bridges, who was born in 1941; Pro Football Hall of Famer Dick Butkus, who was born in 1942; Jay and the Americans co-founder Kenny Vance, who was born in Brooklyn in 1943; World Golf Hall of Famer Tom Kite, who was born in 1949; “Star Trek: The Next Generation” star Michael Dorn, who was born in 1952; basketball player and former Brooklyn resident World B. Free, who was born in 1953; “Dangerous Liaisons” star John Malkovich, who was born in 1953; “Donny & Marie” star Donny Osmond, who was born in 1957; U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, who was born in 1966; “Shark Tank” star Lori Greiner, who was born in 1969; musician Kara DioGuardi, who was born in 1970; “24” star Reiko Aylesworth, who was born in 1972; “Hide and Seek” singer Imogen Heap, who was born in 1977; and Olympic gold medal-winning gymnast McKayla Maroney, who was born in 1995.

Michael Dorn
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

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FREEZE THE DAY: Clarence Birdseye was born in Brooklyn on this day in 1886. The inventor and entrepreneur, who spent his early years in Cobble Hill, was one of the founders of the General Foods Corporation and is considered the father of the frozen food industry. He died in Manhattan in 1956 and was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame in 2005.

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THE BIG REDD ONE: Redd Foxx was born 100 years ago today. The St. Louis native plied his comedic trade on vaudeville stages, in nightclubs, on television, in films and on record albums. His talents reached a national audience with the TV sitcom “Sanford and Son.” He died in 1991 after collapsing during a rehearsal for a new sitcom, “The Royal Family.”

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A JOYFUL ’TOON: “A Charlie Brown Christmas” premiered on this day in 1965. The animated TV special, based on the popular “Peanuts” comic strip by Charles M. Schulz and featuring a jazz score by Vince Guaraldi, follows Charlie Brown as he tries to find meaning in Christmas beyond its commercial trappings. A hit with audiences and critics, its annual rebroadcast has become a beloved Yuletide tradition for millions of people.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“If you can see the handwriting on the wall, you’re on the toilet.”

— comedian Redd Foxx, who was born on this day in 1922


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