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October 12: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

October 12, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1892, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “And now, when it would seem that all had been done that could be done, to give honor to the name and perpetuate the glorious deeds of Columbus the discoverer, the city of New York, reflecting but the national expression, commemorates the heroism of four hundred years ago by a military parade, the like of which for magnitude, for splendor and for patriotic sentiment has never been surpassed. The host that marched the streets of New York this morning represented the mighty army, militia and marine service of the United States, the Grand Army of the Republic, the fire departments and the civic societies of New York and surrounding cities … The ceremonies of the day were inaugurated at sunrise. From half a hundred church towers the glad chimes rang out a welcome to the anniversary day, and arising in tintinnabulous melody above the awakening city gave all mankind within hearing a musical invitation to partake in the festivities of the day. Loudest of all spoke old Trinity’s bells in patriotic rhythmical note, and early as was the hour, there were hundreds who stood in the street, gazing at the weather-stained tower until the last faint echo died away.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Eagle reported, “CLEVELAND — The Cleveland Indians beat the Brooklyn Superbas today and with the game won the world’s baseball championship. The score was 3 to 0. Mixed up with bad breaks against the Brooklyn team were timely hitting by the Indians and poor baseball on the part of the National Leaguers.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1942, the Eagle reported, “Although the city registration was off 12 percent from that of 1938, the year of the last state election, leaders of the three political parties today asserted that the light registration would favor their candidates. The last day of registration, Saturday, saw a spurt which brought the city total to 2,135,710. The number registering on Saturday was 841,689, the second heaviest final day registration in the history of the city. Registration in Brooklyn dropped 13 percent as compared with 1938. In 1938, the borough figure was 859,849. This year it was 744,550. Queens dropped only 2.6 percent, from 426,163 to 414,878. The heavy registration in Queens was regarded as favorable to the candidacy of Attorney General [John J.] Bennett, Democratic choice for governor … Political leaders expressed the belief that the fall in registration was due to the absence of many thousands of men in the armed forces and the migration of others to war production work elsewhere … James A. Farley, Democratic state chairman, said that the final registration figures for the city were ‘gratifying.’ He added that he was convinced that ‘we can expect much more than the usual Democratic plurality in New York City.’ Edwin F. Jaeckle, Republican state chairman, also drew comfort from the figures. He said that Thomas E. Dewey, Republican gubernatorial candidate, ‘will about break even in the city’ and will receive ‘a resounding plurality upstate comparable to the 617,000 figure of 1938.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “PARIS (U.P.) — The United States warned the Soviet Union today that the American rearmament program is being speeded to ‘stay the heavy hand of Russia’s constant drive for world power.’ U.S. Delegate Warren Austin made this statement in a speech before the United Nations Political Committee, which was considering a Russian proposal for immediate one-third disarmament by the Big Five Powers. Russian Delegate Andrei Vishinsky replied in a shouting, screaming speech of one hour and 57 minutes in which he made some of the bitterest charges ever heard in a United Nations meeting. Austin had taken a leaf from Vishinsky’s book. Instead of defending American policy, he took the offensive. He denounced Russia for blocking a lasting peace, creating a threat to peace, refusing to cooperate in the U.N. and frustrating a settlement of the Berlin crisis. Admitting that the United States disarmed ‘too far and too fast’ after World War II, Austin said this mistake was going to be remedied by a stepped-up rearmament program designed to protect against Russian aims of world domination.”

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Hugh Jackman
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP
Charlie Ward
David J. Phillip/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include former N.Y. Yankees shortstop Tony Kubek, who was born in 1935; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Sam Moore (Sam & Dave), who was born in 1935; TV anchor Chris Wallace, who was born in 1947; actress and model Susan Anton, who was born in 1950; Tesla singer Jeff Keith, who was born in 1958; “24” star Carlos Bernard, who was born in 1962; “Valley Girl” star Deborah Foreman, who was born in 1962; “X-Men” star Hugh Jackman, who was born in 1968; former NFL defensive tackle Leon Lett, who was born in 1968; “Growing Pains” star Kirk Cameron, who was born in 1970; former N.Y. Knicks point guard Charlie Ward, who was born in 1970; “The Sandlot” star Tom Guiry, who was born in 1981; and “Roswell, New Mexico” star Tyler Blackburn, who was born in 1986.

Carlos Bernard
Chris Pizzello/AP

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EXECUTIVE DECISION: President Theodore Roosevelt officially renamed the Executive Mansion “the White House” on this day in 1901. At various times it had also been known as the “President’s Palace” and the “President’s House.” Every president since John Adams has lived in the building at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. in Washington, D.C.

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FEATS OF CLAY: Art Clokey was born on this day in 1921. The stop-motion clay animation pioneer is best known as the creator of Gumby and his horse Pokey, who first appeared on the “Howdy Doody Show” before starring in their own series. He also co-created “Davey and Goliath,” which was funded by the Lutheran Church in America. He died in 2010.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“So there’s an attraction that we have to beauty that is innate. But sadly I think the pressure young girls are up against now is incredibly unhealthy.”

— actress and model Susan Anton, who was born on this day in 1950


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