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October 2: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

October 2, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1869, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “There are indications that the troubled period through which our earth has been passing amid volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, hurricanes, eclipses, meteor showers, and other startling phenomena, is not yet ended. Disturbances in South America threaten a repetition of the convulsions of last year. The people of the West Indies are reminded that they cannot long hope to have peace. An experienced weather prophet asserts with emphasis that the late New England gale will be followed shortly by one more tremendous, and an earthquake prophet prepares the Californians for dreadful disasters. Philosophers are busy investigating the causes of these grave results, but people who are not philosophers are chiefly concerned with the facts themselves. We have been taught to believe that the volcanic and earthquake stage had become historical, but that theory is getting negatived. The demonstrations are as violent as they ever were, and seem to be extending over a wider field of operations. Hurricanes are no longer confined to tropical regions, and who can tell at what moment our quiet mountains may develop fiery craters? Some time ago we republished from that non-sensational journal, the London Spectator, an article going to show that the mysterious magnetic influence pervading the solar system probably has a moral and intellectual as well as a material effect, and that there might be a close relation to human passions and natural phenomena. Are earthquakes and sea-bores and eclipses responsible for the financial crisis and gold-gambling in Wall Street?”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1938, the Eagle reported, “The recent visit of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth to France influenced the world of stamps as well as the political sphere. For the first time in the history of postage stamps (the first was issued in 1840), an English King’s act has been commemorated by a foreign design. The royal pair were honored by a stamp showing the clasped hands of Great Britain and France, which appeared shortly after their visit. Although Great Britain was first in the world with adhesive postage stamps, she is last in number of personalities shown on her postal portraits. Queen Victoria, both Edwards and both Georges, with the present Queen Elizabeth, who succeeded her, have been the only ones to receive this honor. An unwritten law, born in the Victorian era, when some members of Parliament suggested stamp pictures for Albert and the juvenile members of the royal family in addition to those bearing the Queen, and were silently voted down, left the regent as the sole occupant of all stamp designs. It was not until the sudden abdication of Edward VIII and the ascension of George VI to the throne that the 97-year-old precedent was broken. To sell the new King and Queen quickly to the people of Great Britain it was decided to issue a Coronation stamp showing George and Elizabeth. Both look every inch a royal pair in the picture employed in the design. All Britain’s regular issues, however, revert to the old standard and we only see George’s picture on the new values which are rapidly succeeding the old ones showing his late father.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1951, the Eagle reported, “POLO GROUNDS – The scene of the playoff drama for the championship of the National League shifts to this historic ballpark on the banks of the Harlem today with the Dodgers determined that it shall not be the last act. A Brooklyn win before an expected 50,000 house would make a third game necessary. The Weather Man has promised another fine baseball afternoon with warm and smiling skies overhead. Manager Leo Durocher’s miracle ball club has been installed a top-heavy favorite to close out the series and gain a full day’s rest before meeting the Yankees Thursday in the first game of the World Series. Manager Chuck Dressen has other ideas. The rush seats were put on sale at 9:30 this morning and the bleacher line began forming last night. All reserved seats had been sold. The Giants took the first game at Ebbets Field yesterday, 3 to 1, behind the five-hit pitching of big Jim Hearn, already scenting his first World Series prize money. Ralph Branca had the misfortune to throw a couple of home run balls that made the difference in the final score.”

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Lorraine Bracco
Evan Agostini/AP
Avery Brooks
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include former N.Y. Knicks guard and two-time NBA champion Dick Barnett, who was born in 1936; film critic Rex Reed, who was born in 1938; “American Pie” singer Don McLean, who was born in 1945; “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” star Avery Brooks, who was born in 1948; fashion designer Donna Karan, who was born in 1948; photographer Annie Leibovitz, who was born in 1949; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Mike Rutherford (Genesis), who was born in 1950; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Sting (The Police), who was born in 1951; “Goodfellas” star Lorraine Bracco, who was born in Brooklyn in 1954; singer-songwriter Gillian Welch, who was born in 1967; talk show host Kelly Ripa, who was born in 1970; former N.Y. Knicks center Tyson Chandler, who was born in 1982; and N.Y. Yankees outfielder Aaron Hicks, who was born in 1989.

Sting
Evan Agostini/AP

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HELLO CHARLIE: “The Peanuts” debuted on this day in 1950. The beloved comic strip by Charles Schulz chronicled the adventures and anxieties of Charlie Brown, Lucy, Linus, Sally and Charlie’s dog Snoopy. Dozens of animated specials based on the strip have been produced over the years, including “A Charlie Brown Christmas” and “It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown.” The last strip was published on Feb. 13, 2000.

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EQUAL JUSTICE: Thurgood Marshall was sworn in as the first black associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court on this day in 1967. Marshall was nominated by President Lyndon Baines Johnson and was confirmed by the Senate with a vote of 69-11. He announced his resignation on June 27, 1991 and was succeeded by Clarence Thomas, the second black justice on the court.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“My favorite poem is the one that starts ‘Thirty days hath September,’ because it actually tells you something.”

— comedian Groucho Marx, who was born on this day in 1890


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