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June 28: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 28, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1881, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The general quiet and freedom from accidents which have characterized the Fourth of July observances since the new ordinances went into operation will be experienced again this year. The authorities propose to enforce the law to the letter, and the police commissioner has already issued his orders to the force under his direction. Under the ordinance, the use of firearms in the city is prohibited on the Fourth, as well as other days; also, fireworks, such as firecrackers, cannon crackers, Chinese rockets, Chinese bombs, double headers, squibs, serpents or chasers, spitdevils, grasshoppers, torbillons or table rockets, flying pigeons, colored tableau fire, containing sulphur as an ingredient, and Union torpedoes. The ordinances also provide that these fireworks named shall not be manufactured, stored or kept on sale. Other kinds of fireworks may be used.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1925, Eagle columnist Frederick Boyd Stevenson wrote, “In Albany last Wednesday articles of incorporation were filed by the Federal Motion Picture Council in America, Inc. It was decided to incorporate this organization at the Third National Motion Picture Conference, held in Washington, D.C., on January 14, 15 and 16 this year. At that conference, delegates were present from 116 agencies, local, county, state, national and international. The organizations represented were from twenty-three states and four foreign countries. The purpose is to mobilize all forces for wholesome motion pictures. To accomplish this, some of the objectives aimed at are: To assist members of local organizations, both church and secular groups, in evaluating motion pictures, and thus enable them to intelligently commend or condemn the picture surveyed; to conduct an education campaign in order that parents and others in authority may be brought to a realization of the effects of unwholesome motion pictures upon children and youth; to work for the state regulation of motion pictures without unnecessary expense to the state or individual. (The methods of police and court procedure based upon ancient common law and more recent statutes are slow, expensive and inadequate); to have the appointment of state motion picture commissioners placed in the hands of the State Board of Education instead of being appointed by the governor, thus removing the danger that for partisan and improper reasons he might appoint persons without proper qualifications. (The New York State Commission is appointed by the governor); to secure federal regulation of motion pictures, because state regulation, at best, only removes the evil already in the film, whereas federal regulation will not only set proper standards for the whole country but will effectively direct at their source the production of morally clean films before the evil has been filmed.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “The Associated Press, recently ordered by the U.S. Supreme Court to amend its by-laws because they constitute violation of the Sherman anti-trust act, has announced it will file a petition for re-hearing. The A.P. board of directors said yesterday the Department of Justice had agreed to permit filing of the petition by Sept. 1. The Supreme Court decision ruled that A.P. by-laws should be amended to permit membership applications without consideration of competitive effects upon existing members.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “TAIPEI, FORMOSA (U.P.) — Generalissimo Chiang Kai-Shek’s Nationalist Government was reported to have issued a ‘cease-fire’ order to its air and naval forces today in compliance with President Truman’s request. Reliable sources reported the order was issued as the Nationalist cabinet conferred all day on the ramifications of President Truman’s announcement that the U.S. 7th Fleet will help protect Formosa from any Chinese Communist invasion. An official source said, however, that no orders were issued to cease ferrying supplies to Nationalist guerillas behind Communist lines on the main island. Chiang was informed officially of Mr. Truman’s decision Tuesday night by U.S. Charge d’Affaires Robert Strong. But Chiang’s headquarters and top Nationalist officials refused to comment on the order. Meantime, American warships were on patrol in the narrow Formosa strait, where Chinese Communist forces were expected to cross for the invasion of Formosa.”

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Kathy Bates
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP
Mel Brooks
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Oscar-winning filmmaker Mel Brooks, who was born in Brooklyn in 1926; Super Bowl V MVP Chuck Howley, who was born in 1936; actor and impressionist John Byner, who was born in 1938; former Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta, who was born in 1938; former N.Y. Yankees pitcher Al Downing, who was born in 1941; “X-Men” star Bruce Davison, who was born in 1946; Oscar-winning actress Kathy Bates, who was born in 1948; “Star Trek: First Contact” star Alice Krige, who was born in 1954; Pro Football Hall of Famer John Elway, who was born in 1960; former major league first baseman Mark Grace, who was born in 1964; “Some Kind of Wonderful” star Mary Stuart Masterson, who was born in 1966; “Ally McBeal” star Gil Bellows, who was born in 1967; “All in the Family” star Danielle Brisebois, who was born in Brooklyn in 1969; entrepreneur Elon Musk, who was born in 1971; singer and actress Kellie Pickler, who was born in 1986; and Washington Wizards guard Bradley Beal, who was born in 1993.

Elon Musk
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

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A WORLD IN CRISIS: Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife Sophie were assassinated in Sarajevo on this day in 1914. The assassination is considered the immediate cause of World War I. The Treaty of Versailles, which ended the war, was signed in 1919 on the fifth anniversary of their deaths.

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FIGHTING BACK: The Stonewall riot began on this day in 1969. Early in the morning, the clientele of a Manhattan gay bar, the Stonewall Inn, rioted after the club was raided by police. The riot was followed by several days of demonstrations. It is recognized today as the start of the gay liberation movement.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Humor is just another defense against the universe.”

— filmmaker Mel Brooks, who was born in Brooklyn on this day in 1926


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