Brooklyn Boro

June 16: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 16, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1912, a Brooklyn Daily Eagle editorial said, “Promotion day is nearly at hand, and practically every pupil in the public schools knows whether he or she will ‘pass.’ Owing to the crowded condition of the schools, all students are given every possible encouragement to reach the standard required for promotion, so that they may be well enough equipped to continue higher studies in the fall. Consequently, nearly all the boys and girls in the Brooklyn elementary schools will find themselves in a new classroom or a high school in the fall. Earnest effort, punctuality and regular attendance, proper conduct and good scholarship are thus rewarded.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Eagle reported, “Federal Commissioner of Prohibition John F. Kramer, speaking last night at the Central Y.M.C.A. to a group of Brooklyn ministers who met under the auspices of the Brooklyn Division of Allied Citizens of America, declared that the Supreme Court decision on the validity of prohibition has put the courts, the newspapers, district attorneys and state and local authorities into an attitude of co-operation with the federal authorities. The whole attitude of the country with regard to the law has changed completely, he said. ‘The essential thing now,’ he said, ‘is the co-operation of the people themselves. Prohibition is here to stay forever because it will be impossible ever to get thirty-six states to agree to wipe the Eighteenth Amendment out of the Constitution. It must be made effective and not be allowed to become a farce. Unless the people of the country take this matter seriously and realize their own responsibility and help the authorities by their compliance to the law and by their sentiment in favor of its observance, it cannot be properly enforced.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1935, the Eagle reported, “With Nov. 15 set as the date for the official opening of the subway through upper Fulton St., the old Bedford section, now known as Central Brooklyn, is preparing for an elaborate celebration of the great event in the history of the borough’s old historic residential district. Real estate and banking interests in the district vision an extensive structural transformation of the locality with a rebound back to old-time real estate values, following the operation of this much-needed high-speed transit improvement. Several large real estate transactions closed during the past few weeks involving sites for modern apartment houses are forerunners of a period of real estate activity in the old Bedford section, real estate brokers along Fulton St. declare. With favorable prospects for the success of the unified transit plan of the city and the proposal to widen the thoroughfare, upper Fulton St. should develop into one of the most important shopping arteries of the city.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1940, the Eagle reported, “Coney Island has suddenly clamped down on scanty attire in the streets. From now on, the Coney Island Chamber of Commerce announced last night, warnings will be given to persons who walk between their homes and the beach clad only in bathing suits. If the warnings are ignored, summonses will follow. ‘The public is asked to be mindful of the fact that what might be acceptable in the line of attire on the beach is definitely objectionable on the street. Co-operation is asked,’ the chamber announced. An old ruling of the Park Department, which places every street leading to and from the beach for a distance of 250 feet under the jurisdiction of the department, has been invoked to enforce the new bathing attire regulation.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1943, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — Deputy Petroleum Administrator Ralph K. Davies blames the Eastern gasoline shortage and black market operations on a faulty rationing system. Davies, whose agency is seeking control of gasoline and fuel oil rationing, recently told a House Appropriations Subcommittee in testimony released today that both the shortage and the black market could have been prevented ‘if there had been a different control over the distribution of petroleum products.’ Issuance of ration coupons by the OPA, he said, was not held within the limit of available supplies — although the petroleum administration provided accurate forecasts — and too many coupons were issued to certain classes of consumers.”

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Lamont Dozier
Richard Drew/AP
John Cho
Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include National Book Award recipient Joyce Carol Oates, who was born in 1938; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Lamont Dozier, who was born in 1941; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Eddie Levert (The O’Jays), who was born in 1942; former Connecticut Gov. Jodi Rell, who was born in 1946; “Roseanne” star Laurie Metcalf, who was born in 1955; 1981 NBA Rookie of the Year Darrell Griffith, who was born in 1958; World Golf Hall of Famer Phil Mickelson, who was born in 1970; “Star Trek” star John Cho, who was born in 1972; Olympic gold medalist and former New York Ranger Rick Nash, who was born in 1984; former “Saturday Night Live” star Abby Elliott, who was born in 1987; and “Best Friends Whenever” star Lauren Taylor, who was born in 1998.

Laurie Metcalf
Andy Cropa/Invision/AP

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WORDS OF WISDOM: Abraham Lincoln delivered his “House Divided” speech on this day in 1858. Beginning his campaign for the Illinois U.S. Senate seat, he addressed the Republican State Convention at Springfield, saying, “A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe this government cannot endure, permanently, half slave and half free. I do not expect the Union to be dissolved; I do not expect the house to fall; but I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing, or all the other.”

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A NEW PERSPECTIVE: John Howard Griffin was born on this day in 1920. The American author and photographer was deeply concerned about racial problems in the U.S. To better understand black life in the South, he darkened his skin with chemicals and ultraviolet light and kept a journal during his travels. The result was his best-known book, “Black Like Me” (1961). He died in 1980.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Fear dims even the sunlight.”

— author John Howard Griffin, who was born on this day in 1920


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