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New York State shows Washington the path on gun legislation

June 3, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle Staff
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The Assembly has passed a package of legislation to strengthen New York State’s gun laws, and help keep New Yorkers safe in their schools, places of worship and in their communities.

“The recent mass shooting in Buffalo, Uvalde and Tulsa is proof that we cannot wait any longer in taking action to protect our communities from gun violence. Domestic terrorism is unacceptable,” said Assemblymember Rodneyse Bichotte Hermelyn. “As we continue to pray for the victims, we’ve become more proactive and passed stricter gun laws. We now urge that our leaders in Washington DC follow suit. If New York State can do it, so can Washington.”

These set of gun laws will strengthen the 2019 Red Flag Law allowing mental health professionals to help identify a person in crisis and to file Extreme Risk Protection Orders, and raises the age to 21 years old for the purchase of semiautomatic rifles.

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Here are the Ten Gun Law Bills:

  • A.1023-A (Paulin): Helps track guns that have been unlawfully purchased or trafficked outside the state
  • A.6716-A (Wallace): Criminal Liability – Misdemeanor B for “making a threat of mass harm” and Misdemeanor A for “aggravated threat of mass harm”
  • A.7926-A (Rosenthal, L): Division of Criminal Justice Services (DCJS) to establish programs and processes for the implementation of the technology, and would make it a crime to sell a firearm that is not equipped with microstamping technology
  • A.7865-A (Fahy): Requires social media networks in New York to provide a clear and concise policy regarding how they would respond to incidents of hateful conduct on their platform and maintain easily accessible mechanisms for reporting hateful conduct on those platforms
  • A.10428-A(People-Stokes): Would eliminate the grandfathering of those devices that were lawfully possessed prior to the Safe Act or manufactured prior to 1994
  • A. 10497 (Jacobson): Illegal to purchase and sell body vests to anyone that is not engaged in an eligible profession, which includes law enforcement and other professions designated by the Department of State
  • A.10501 (Meeks): Creates a Task Force on Social Media and Violent Extremism within the Office of the Attorney General to study and investigate the role of social media companies in promoting and facilitating violent extremism and domestic terrorism online
  • A. 10502 (Cahill): Expands the list of mental health practitioners that can make a report on an individual that is likely to engage in conduct that would result in serious harm to themself or others, such report is considered in determining whether or not to issue a firearm license to the individual
  • A10503 (Jackson): Require that an individual obtain a license prior to purchasing a semiautomatic rifle.
  • A. 10504 (Burgos): Provides clarification on the definition of firearms and rifles that have been modified to be fired from an arm brace.

The Assembly Majority also passed a resolution (K.1028, Wallace) calling on Congress to reinstate the Federal Assault Weapons Ban of 1994 (prohibiting manufacture of certain semiautomatic firearms and large capacity magazines for use by civilians).

Assemblymember Rodneyse Bichotte Hermelyn represents the 42nd Assembly District in Brooklyn covering Ditmas Park, Flatbush, East Flatbush and Midwood. She is currently the Chair of the Subcommittee on Oversight of Minority and Women-Owned Business Enterprises (MWBEs), Chair of the Task Force on Women’s Issues and serves on the following committees: Housing, Government Operations, Education, Banks, Health, and Higher Education. She also sits on Governor Hochul’s Domestic Violence Advisory Council and Mayor Adams MWBE Task Force.

As a current Assemblymember, District Leader, and Chair of Brooklyn Democratic Party, Rodneyse Bichotte Hermelyn has been an outspoken advocate on issues concerning immigration, education, economic development, unemployment, education reform, health care access, senior citizen centers, affordable housing, school safety, women’s and LGBTQ rights, as well as other issues affecting the quality of life in the community.


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