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January 6: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

January 6, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1919, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “OYSTER BAY, L.I. — Colonel Theodore Roosevelt died in his sleep early today at his home on Sagamore Hill in this village. The exact time of Colonel Roosevelt’s death was 4:15 a.m., as nearly as can be determined, for there was no person at his bedside at the moment he passed away. A minute or two before, his attendant, James Amos, the young colored man who has been in the employ of the Colonel ever since he left the White House, noticed that the patient was breathing heavily in his sleep and went to call a nurse. When he returned with her, the former President was dead. Mrs. Roosevelt was immediately summoned … The former President came to his home on Sagamore Hill from the Roosevelt Hospital on Christmas Day, but a week later —  on New Year’s Day —  was stricken with a severe attack of rheumatism and sciatica, from which he had been suffering for some time … Flags were placed at half-mast in Oyster Bay today … The Colonel’s death came as a shock to the people of Oyster Bay, as friends knew that he was about the house the greater part of yesterday, reading and doing some writing. His two sons abroad, Kermit and Theodore, Jr., are, respectively, officers with the American Forces in France and the Army of the Occupation in Germany.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — President [Franklin] Roosevelt appeared before Congress today with a plea to the nation’s judiciary for ‘an increasingly enlightened view’ of the Constitution. In a thinly veiled warning to the U.S. Supreme Court that it, as well as the other branches of the government, must heed changing times and the will of the people, the president came out against constitutional amendments. Obviously referring to the absent members of the nation’s highest court who knocked out many of the New Deal’s foundation stones, the president, in a surprise move, devoted a major portion of his message to the question of advancing toward the more abundant life. Declaring the National Recovery Administration has been outlawed, but the problems it was designed to meet remain, he said: ‘During the past year there has been a growing belief that there is little fault to be found with the Constitution of the United States as it stands today. The vital need is not an alteration of our fundamental law, but an increasingly enlightened view with reference to it. Difficulties have grown out of its interpretation, but rightly considered, it can be used as an instrument of progress, and not as a device for prevention of action.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle reported, “Mayor [William] O’Dwyer announced yesterday that he plans to sell his one-family house at 449 79th St., Bay Ridge. He and Mrs. O’Dwyer will move in the official city residence, Gracie Mansion, on or about Feb. 1. It is now being renovated and repainted in preparation for their occupation. Sale of the O’Dwyer home, which the family has occupied for nearly 20 years, will be handled by the law firm of the mayor’s brother, Bernstein and O’Dwyer, 40 Wall St., Manhattan.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “In his first pronouncement as police commissioner, Francis W.H. Adams today said he favored putting more cops back on the beat and that he ‘would not tolerate’ police brutality in any form. The basic strength of the department resides in the ‘patrolman-on-post,’ Commissioner Adams asserted. ‘He is the man who, beyond all others, represents the force in the public mind.’ Addressing top officers in the lineup room at Manhattan police headquarters, the commissioner reminded them the man on the beat should command respect in the community. He spoke to some 400 men from acting lieutenants on up in rank. He added he couldn’t say anything specific at this time about putting more men on beats because he was not familiar with present availability and distribution. But he declared it was a ‘good objective.’ Civil rights, he continued, was a ‘matter of deep concern to me. One of our principal responsibilities is to act as guardians of the rights of all men.’”

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Julie Chen
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP
Kate McKinnon
Taylor Jewell/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include College Football Hall of Fame coach Lou Holtz, who was born in 1937; “Mr. Bean” star Rowan Atkinson, who was born in 1955; “Olive Kitteridge” author Elizabeth Strout, who was born in 1956; World Golf Hall of Famer Nancy Lopez, who was born in 1957; Pro Football Hall of Famer Howie Long, who was born in 1960; “The Walking Dead” star Norman Reedus, who was born in 1969; “Big Brother” host Julie Chen, who was born in 1970; volleyball player Gabrielle Reece, who was born in 1970; former N.Y. Jets linebacker James Farrior, who was born in 1975; former NFL cornerback Asante Samuel, who was born in 1981; and Oscar-winning actor Eddie Redmayne, who was born in 1982.

Norman Reedus
Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP

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ROUND AND ROUND: “Wheel of Fortune” premiered on this day in 1975. Created by Merv Griffin, it’s the longest-running syndicated game show in TV history. Players spin a wheel and guess letters in a word puzzle, winning money for every correct guess. The show is co-hosted by Pat Sajak and Vanna White.

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RETURN TRIP: NASA headed back to the moon on this day in 1998. Lunar Explorer, an unmanned probe searching for evidence of frozen water, was the first American craft to travel to the moon since Apollo 17 in 1972. It found evidence of ice in late 1998.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Life is 10 percent what happens to you and 90 percent how you respond to it.”

— College Football Hall of Fame coach Lou Holtz, who was born on this day in 1937


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