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September 24: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

September 24, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1916, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Two prime results were the outcome of the series of talks by outsiders at the Teachers Institutes, the last of which were delivered on Friday: 1 — Teaching the teachers the practical things of today. 2 — Teaching the public what the public schools are doing. Thus the school has been benefited; thus the public has been benefited, and the sum of the two benefits makes for the betterment of the child who becomes the citizen, and thus is created an endless chain making for a combination of good schools and good citizenship which can have but one motive — good government. Teaching the teachers is not a new idea. Teaching the public is not a new idea. But teaching the teachers the practical things of life, by bringing them in direct contact with those who daily follow the practical things, and teaching the public the inside workings of the school by direct contact with the teachers open wide fields of possibilities.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1933, the Eagle reported, “HAVANA (A.P.) — A group of 16 American and British nationals held virtual prisoners of striking miners at the Tanamo Sugar mill near the north coast of Oriente Province tonight prepared to flee to the safety of the United States destroyer Hamilton. Meanwhile, a serious rebellious movement in Matanzas Province had fallen, apparently of its own weight, and the army of President Ramon Grau San Martin turned its attention to the possibility of a serious food shortage in the capital. Eight men, three women and five children were in the party besieged at the sugar mill. American authorities hoped to get them aboard the Hamilton without landing marines or sailors. It was not determined whether all the foreigners would go aboard the Hamilton or whether the men would remain at Tanamo and negotiate with the striking workers. The action of the American government came when food supplies were running short and the children were left without milk. The strikers threatened to cut off the water mains leading to the homes of the foreigners. The mills are about a mile and a half from the coastline. They are owned by American interests, including groups represented by Percy Rockefeller and Vincent Astor.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “Idlewild airport, scheduled to be ready for international operation in the spring, had a new name today — ‘New York International Airport.’ The New York Port Authority renamed the 5,000-acre field on Jamaica Bay. In a letter to Mayor [William] O’Dwyer yesterday, Authority Chairman Howard S. Cullman requested the mayor to have the change made official by the City Council. Austin J. Tobin, executive director of the Authority, said the six main runways of the airport were to be completed by Nov. 15 and the field would be ‘in good operating condition’ by next spring. Mr. Tobin said he expected both New York International Airport and LaGuardia Field to be on a paying basis.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1951, the Eagle reported, “A Dodger fan got on line early today for a World Series ticket at Ebbets Field — and he settled himself down for the long wait until Oct. 5. He is Samuel Maxwell, 62, of N. Oxford St., who calls himself the No. 1 Dodger fan of 1951. The Dodgers have not yet clinched the National League pennant but Maxwell, like most rooters, believes that the team is ‘in.’ The enthusiastic rooter is a veteran of World War I and he arrived at Ebbets Field equipped with warm clothing, a blanket and a chair. He took a post in front of the bleacher entrance to the park, at Bedford Ave. and Montgomery St., and plans to remain there until the classic starts. He will sleep in the chair, he told reporters, and has made arrangements with others to keep him supplied with food. He did not appear to be concerned over a job or business. Despite a chill wind which swept around the field early today, the veteran fan appeared to be quite comfortable. Maxwell displayed a sign reading, ‘Give a ticket to a wounded veteran’ and also bearing the inscription ‘It’s the sweetest day of the year.’ Attached to the sign is a homemade calendar, from which Maxwell plans to tear a date sheet from day to day until the series opens.”

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“Mean” Joe Greene
Gene J. Puskar/AP
Nia Vardalos
Andy Kropa/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include TV commentator Lou Dobbs, who was born in 1945; Pro Football Hall of Famer “Mean” Joe Greene, who was born in 1946; “NYPD Blue” star Gordon Clapp, who was born in 1948; former N.Y. Mets outfielder Hubie Brooks, who was born in 1956; “Hercules: The Legendary Journeys” star Kevin Sorbo, who was born in 1958; “My Big Fat Greek Wedding” star Nia Vardalos, who was born in 1962; former N.Y. Mets outfielder Bernard Gilkey, who was born in 1966; Slipknot founder Shawn “Clown” Crahan, who was born in 1969; “Dark Skies” star Megan Ward, who was born in 1969; Heisman Trophy winner and former NFL running back Eddie George, who was born in 1973; and “The Politician” star Ben Platt, who was born in 1993.

Kevin Sorbo
Matt Sayles/AP

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THE SPORTING LIFE, PART 1: Lottie Dod was born in England 150 years ago today. Known as the “Little Wonder,” she was one of the greatest female athletes of all time. She excelled at tennis, golf, field hockey and archery, among other sports. She died in 1960 and was elected to the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1983.

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THE SPORTING LIFE, PART 2: Jim McKay was born 100 years ago today. The Philadelphia native was best known as the host of ABC’s “Wide World of Sports” from 1961 to 1998. He also covered the Kentucky Derby, the Indianapolis 500, the Olympics and many other events. He was elected to the Television Hall of Fame in 1995 and died in 2008.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Never confuse a single defeat with a final defeat.”

— author F. Scott Fitzgerald, who was born on this day in 1896


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