July 26: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

July 26, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1910, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “HAVANA — The government is much alarmed over the insurrection at El Caney, in the province of Santiago de Cuba. Following a midnight council at the palace, troops were rushed to the disaffected district today. The insurgents are reported as retreating into the hills, pursued by troops already in the province. The insurrection is believed to be of a serious character. Last night the government learned that General Miniet and Colonel Jane, revolutionary veterans, had taken to the woods at the head of about a score of followers. Miniet is a man of influence and it was feared that many malcontents would rally around his standard. The council of war was hastily called at the palace and the situation thoroughly discussed. It was determined to rush troops to El Caney.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1935, the Eagle reported, “BERLIN — No Jews will represent Germany in the 1936 Olympics because of what the Jews call discrimination against them by Nazi sports leaders and what the Nazis call the incompetence of Jewish athletes, it was learned today. A Nazi official, referring to elimination contests, said: ‘Of course Jews competed in the first test, but none survived.’ The Jews were said to be considering the complete dissolution of the Jewish Sports Club, their leading athletic organization, with a membership of 800 athletes. A number of the staff of Hans Von Tschammer Und Osten, Nazi sports commissioner, pointed to the establishment of a training camp for Jewish sportsmen and opportunities given them for participating in the eliminations, now being concluded, as indicating the Nazi fairness to Olympic aspirants. Men prominent in the Berlin Jewish community, however, said ‘pressure to lower the morale of our competitors,’ the virtual elimination of all training facilities and ‘the general attitude toward the Jews’ constitute ‘a flagrant violation of at least the spirit of many promises that there would be no discrimination against Jews.’ Among the hundreds of athletes participating in the Berlin preliminary competitions, only six were Jews.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “TOKYO (U.P.) — The Korean war armistice will be signed at 10 a.m. Monday, informed sources said today … The truce signing was expected today, but the Communists apparently could not make up their minds who would sign the historic document for them, the sources said. The sources said that an announcement probably will be made officially late today setting 10 a.m. Monday as the time of the signing of the truce in a hut in Panmunjom. Only a few details of the final signing ceremony remain to be worked out, the sources said … The armistice could have been signed days ago — saving thousands of lives — but for the reluctance of North Korean Communist dictator Kim Il Sung to appear in public for the truce signing ceremony.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “Manager Casey Stengel harbored three distinct qualms about the American League pennant race as he took his team west today for what could be the toughest road trip of the season. 1 — His pitching is admittedly ‘shaky’; 2 — The Cleveland Indians are a much tougher pennant rival than they ever were; 3 — The schedule, the way he sees it, gives the Indians a better break than the Yankees. What’s more, wily old Case is longing to shift Mickey Mantle to shortstop in an effort to juice up the Yankees’ batting attack, but is afraid the young slugger’s gimpy knee might not be able to stand it. The idea of shifting Mantle to shortstop has been incubating in Stengel’s mind since last season. He gave the 22-year-old switch hitter a crack at the infield during the weekend series with Cleveland and liked what he saw. ‘If I shifted Mantle to shortstop, I’ll bet anyone he’d hit the ball farther and throw the ball harder than any shortstop in baseball,’ Casey said enthusiastically yesterday after his Yankees had beaten the Indians 4-3 in 11 innings at the Stadium to move within 1 1/2 games of first place.”

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Darlene Love
Montclair Film Festival/Wikimedia Commons
Dorothy Hamill
John Mathew Smith/Wikimedia Commons

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Pro Football Hall of Famer Bob Lilly, who was born in 1939; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Darlene Love, who was born in 1941; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Mick Jagger (The Rolling Stones), who was born in 1943; Oscar-winning actress Helen Mirren, who was born in 1945; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Roger Taylor (Queen), who was born in 1949; figure skater and Olympic gold medalist Dorothy Hamill, who was born in 1956; “Star Trek: Deep Space Nine” star Nana Visitor, who was born in 1957; Extreme singer Gary Cherone, who was born in 1961; Oscar-winning actress Sandra Bullock, who was born in 1964; “Underworld” star Kate Beckinsale, who was born in 1973; and snowboarder and Olympic gold medalist Kelly Clark, who was born in 1983.

Mick Jagger
Georges Biard/Wikimedia Commons

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THE OLD MAN: Jean Shepherd was born 100 years ago today. The Chicago native is best known for his semi-autobiographical book “In God We Trust: All Others Pay Cash,” which inspired the classic 1983 film “A Christmas Story” and its 1994 sequel “My Summer Story,” both of which he narrated. He died in 1999.

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STEPPING UP: President George H.W. Bush signed the Americans with Disabilities Act on this day in 1990. The law, which went into effect two years later, required that public facilities be made accessible to people with disabilities.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

Quotable:

“The truth will always have a market.”

— writer Jean Shepherd, who was born on this day in 1921


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