Brooklyn Boro

July 9: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

July 9, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1912, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “STOCKHOLM — The fourth day of the Olympic meet was given up to trial heats in several events and two finals in which the United States did not figure. The Yankee athletes continued to display their superiority over all comers. All the stars qualified in their respective events and the showing they made indicates that they will repeat their triumphs when the finals come along.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1916, the Eagle reported, “There will be no quarantine of New York City because of the epidemic of infantile paralysis. This was announced yesterday, after a conference in which health officers of the nation, state and city took part. Health Department officials yesterday appeared to breathe more easily. It was evident that, although they did not care to say the epidemic was under control, it was at least ‘well in hand,’ to use the words of Dr. James P. Leak of the Federal Public Health Service, who is now in this city cooperating with the local Health Department. Commissioner Emerson was asked if he could say that the epidemic was at last under control. ‘I do not think I can justly say so yet,’ he replied. ‘The best I can say at this time is that the increase in the epidemic is not being maintained.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1932, the Eagle reported, “Governor [Franklin D.] Roosevelt today had before him Samuel Seabury’s challenge that he determine ‘whether the public interests and the maintenance of decent standards among public officials require that the Hon. James J. Walker be removed from the office of Mayor of New York City.’ The challenge came as the governor, well in the lead of aspirants for the Democratic nomination for president, awaits the assembling of delegates in the Democratic national convention 18 days hence. Speculation today centered on whether the governor would take action in the case of the mayor, idol of Tammany Hall, before the convention and the possible effect of the charges on his presidential chances.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1936, the Eagle reported, “CHICAGO (A.P.) — Scattered rains brought temporary relief today to a few sections in the nation blanketed by stifling heat, but no general break was forecast in the torrid weather. Deaths reached at least 168, and blazing destruction continued to mow crops in the fertile fields of the Middle West. Misery, want and despair grew in the agricultural regions. Spreading East, the heat wave involved about half of the nation, and temperatures in three figures were in prospect for most states from midcontinent to the Eastern seaboard … Reports from New York State indicated new heat records would be set, while Connecticut, New Jersey and Michigan foresaw continued high marks.”

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THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “Mayor [Fiorello] LaGuardia’s definite announcement of his candidacy for re-election, coupled with his statement declaring his willingness to run in the Republican primary, today produced a shift in the ranks of the Republican city leaders. The Eagle was reliably informed that the GOP chieftains, whose ranks are badly divided on the issue of the mayor’s redesignation, are now inclined to take the position that, instead of an open rejection of the mayor by the leaders, the issue should be put up to the enrolled Republicans in the city primaries, with the city leaders themselves taking a hands-off attitude.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “LONDON (U.P.) — An official announcement of the engagement of Princess Elizabeth and Lt. Philip Mountbatten, former Prince Philip of Greece, was in preparation by Buckingham Palace today for imminent publication … A short engagement to be followed by a wedding in October was expected in court circles. Both Philip and Elizabeth were at the palace as the announcement was being prepared.”

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Richard Roundtree
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP
Tom Hanks
Matt Licari/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “Shaft” star Richard Roundtree, who was born in 1942; “Strangers” author Dean Koontz, who was born in 1945; “October Sky” star Chris Cooper, who was born in 1951; U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, who was born in 1955; “NYPD Blue” star Jimmy Smits, who was born in Brooklyn in 1955; Oscar-winner Tom Hanks, who was born in 1956; Hole singer Courtney Love, who was born in 1964; Anthrax bassist Frank Bello, who was born in 1965; The White Stripes singer Jack White, who was born in 1975; “The Wonder Years” star Fred Savage, who was born in 1976; long-distance runner and Olympian Kara Goucher, who was born in 1978; and Cheetah Girl Kiely Williams, who was born in 1986.

Courtney Love
Mark Von Holden/Invision/AP

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MAKING AMENDS: The 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified on this day in 1868. It provided that no state shall have the right to abridge the rights of any citizen without due process and equal protection under the law. It was proposed in response to issues related to former slaves after the Civil War.

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HIGH-WATER MARK: The highest tsunami in history was recorded on this day in 1958. An earthquake registering 8.3 on the Richter scale caused a massive landslide at the head of Lituya Bay, Alaska, which in turn created a tsunami of 1,700 feet. A 300-foot wave immediately followed, scouring bare about four to five square miles of land on both sides of the bay. Amazingly, only five people were killed.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

Quotable:

“If you do the same thing too often, it gets to be the only thing you can do.”

— Richard Roundtree, who was born on this day in 1942


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