Brooklyn Boro

June 2: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 2, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1860, a Brooklyn Daily Eagle editorial said, “A couple of rails said to have been split by ‘Honest Old Abe,’ thirty years ago, have been sent into market, not for firewood but to be cut up in splinters for crazy Republicans to go in extacies over, like a devotee over a genuine piece of wood from Noah’s ark. The Atlantic cable charms will have to make way for Lincoln rails, made into tooth-picks. Fortunately, rails are a plentiful commodity, and the demand can be supplied at moderate rates. If the sacred touch of Abe is needed to sanctify them for all true believers in the irrepressible conflict, Lincoln might realize his expenses by wood chopping between this and November; it would be more profitable, as well as a much safer and easier course than making speeches or writing letters.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1921, the Eagle reported, “TULSA, OKLA. (A.P.) — Outwardly, Tulsa resumed its normal atmosphere today except for the presence, under a martial law proclamation, of approximately 500 Oklahoma National Guardsmen sent here yesterday after many hours of rioting between Negroes and white men, including a night of incendiarism in which virtually the entire Negro quarter was destroyed with a loss of $1,500,000. Shortly before 10 o’clock, Adjt. Gen. C.F. Barrett announced that the number of state troops here would be reduced today to 250, with the lifting of martial law, depending on the apparent ability of city and county authorities to cope with conditions. As the situation rapidly quieted down today, the estimates of killed and wounded dwindled. Nine white men had been identified today and 15 Negroes were accounted for. Basis for estimates that still ranged as high as 40 Negroes dead was the possibility of an unknown number of bodies having been destroyed when the torch was applied to the Negro residence district. Casual search of the quarter failed to disclose additional bodies or bones today, but a thorough search by the guardsmen was planned for later in the day.”

DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “The mayoralty situation took on a decided Brooklyn tinge today with the possibility that the principal rivals may each come from this borough. The Democratic nomination for District Attorney William O’Dwyer is apparently in the bag, although Edward J. Flynn, Bronx chieftain, is still silent on his stand. O’Dwyer backing by the America Labor Party is also considered likely, which would count against the prosecutor in the eyes of some of the Democratic leaders because of the communistic element which is said to be active in the labor group. At the same time, Controller Joseph D. McGoldrick appeared to be top man on the Republican list of those most likely to succeed in a mayoralty race on their ticket. However, others mentioned with Mr. McGoldrick were Council President Newbold Morris and Councilman Stanley M. Isaacs. Mr. Morris and Mr. Isaacs are Manhattan residents. With Mr. McGoldrick on the GOP ticket, a merger for the race would be in line with the Liberal party, which has been in favor of Mr. McGoldrick for some time.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1953, the Eagle reported, “LONDON (U.P.) — Elizabeth II was crowned Queen of Britain and the Commonwealth today in a ceremony of solemn beauty before the great altar of Westminster Abbey. The 27-year-old queen, gay along the processional route to her coronation, tremulous yet self-possessed and grave during the ceremony, took the oath to govern her peoples according to their laws, to govern with justice and mercy and uphold the laws of God. Then came the moment of majestic beauty. The young queen sat in ancient St. Edward’s chair under which is the Stone of Scone or destiny. A rich tunic cloth of gold fell softly over her body. In one hand she grasped the scepter, the ensign of power and justice, and in the other, the rod with the dove, symbol of equity and mercy. Her eyes were fixed on the altar. Before her stood the Archbishop of Canterbury. High above his head he held the jeweled crown of St. Edward, poised for an unforgettable second. Then, slowly, the golden circlet, its jewels gleaming in the candlelight, was lowered to the queen’s head. And the ancient abbey, where for 900 years British monarchs have been crowned, echoed to a mighty roar: ‘God save the Queen.’”

***

-->
Morena Baccarin
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP
Zachary Quinto
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “M*A*S*H*” star Sally Kellerman, who was born in 1937; “Mike Hammer” star Stacy Keach, who was born in 1941; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Charlie Watts (The Rolling Stones), who was born in 1941; “Leave It to Beaver” star Jerry Mathers, who was born in 1948; NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman, who was born in 1952; political commentator Jeanine Pirro, who was born in 1951; “24” star Dennis Haysbert, who was born in 1954; former Yankees and Mets pitcher Mike Stanton, who was born in 1967; “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” star Wayne Brady, who was born in 1972; “Prison Break” star Wentworth Miller, who was born in 1972; “Star Trek” star Zachary Quinto, who was born in 1977; “Homeland” star Morena Baccarin, who was born in 1979; and National Soccer Hall of Famer Abby Wambach, who was born in 1980.

Wentworth Miller
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

***

SPELLBOUND: The Salem witch trials began on this day in 1692. As the village of Salem was gripped by the terror of witches, Massachusetts Bay Colony Gov. Sir William Phips ordered a special court to expedite judgment of the more than 150 people accused of witchcraft.

***

HEY JUDE: Thomas Hardy was born on this day in 1840. The English novelist, dramatist, and poet is renowned for the novels “Tess of the d’Urbervilles” and “Jude the Obscure.” His oeuvre mirrors both his personal and broader societal changes, including the decline in Christianity, the movement from reticence to openness about sexuality, the shift from an agricultural to a modern economy and the contrast between the universe and the individual. He died in 1928.

***

Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

Quotable:

“Time changes everything except something within us which is always surprised by change.”
— Thomas Hardy, who was born on this day in 1840


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment