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May 15: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

May 15, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — President Roosevelt forced a controversial program before Congress today and moved to hammer his judiciary reorganization bill to a showdown vote. There were Democratic protests that Mr. Roosevelt’s court tactics would split the party permanently. Consensus of observers here is that the court bill is headed for compromise and the president for defeat if he forces the issue, but the decision may be a close one. Returning yesterday from his fishing trip, Mr. Roosevelt met his Congressional leaders and revealed his legislative plans. There was no mention of action this year to legislate for business some compensation for the advantages gained by labor under the collective bargaining guarantee of the Wagner Act. Congressional leaders said Mr. Roosevelt would: 1. Require the Senate to vote on his bill to expand the Supreme Court from nine to 15 members; 2. Compel Congress to decide for itself how to effect a 10 to 15 percent saving in next year’s budget; 3. Send a special message to Congress next week proposing the establishment of additional Federal power authorities patterned after TVA; 4. Perhaps ask Congress to enact minimum wage and maximum hours legislation at this session.” 

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ON THIS DAY IN 1942, the Eagle reported, “Gasoline rationing went into effect in 17 eastern states today and proved more drastic in practice than the ration cards allowed. An increasing number of services stations in the city, having used up their second third-of-the-month supply, had only dry pumps to offer customers. Holders of X (unlimited) ration cards got no better treatment than the lowly A’s. New supplies to stations will not be delivered until the middle of next week. In Washington, at the same time, OPA authorities considered a still further tightening of the rationing situation, growing out of the unexpectedly large number of X and B cards. The three gallons a week for drivers with A cards could be met, it had been calculated, if at least a third of the east coast’s 8,500,000 motorists fell into the A (non-essential) classification. However, early reports from many large cities, including New York, indicated that only 25 percent of the total were, at present, A cards, with X and B cards to that extent more than expected.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “TEL AVIV (U.P.) — Arab planes bombed Tel Aviv three times today and one Egyptian air force pilot was taken prisoner when his plane was forced down just north of the new Jewish capital. The Egyptian government in Cairo announced officially that Egyptian planes raided the newborn State of Israel in the forefront of an Arab attack from all sides, including one raid on a Jewish airdrome outside Tel Aviv … Egyptian troops driving into Palestine have ‘wiped out’ a Jewish settlement on the road to Beersheba, an official communique in Cairo said today … Jewish sources said direct Arab-Jewish negotiations for a truce in Jerusalem were started after Jews captured virtually all strongpoints abandoned by the British in the Holy City … Egyptian troops spearheaded the Arab assault, attempting an amphibious landing 21 miles south of Tel Aviv and crashing across the southern Palestine border at two points. Syrian and Lebanese troops roared down across the northern frontier several hours before the midnight deadline, riding into battle in 150 armored trucks.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “Thousands of Brooklyn residents will line the streets of Bay Ridge Sunday for the annual colorful parade and rally of the Norwegian-American 17th of May Committee of Greater New York. Elaborate floats will highlight the parade, which will include large community bands. Many of the marchers will wear traditional Norwegian national costumes. Eighty Norwegian-American organizations are represented on the parade committee under L. Kaare Johansen’s chairmanship. Secretary of Agriculture Orville L. Freeman will be the main speaker at a rally program in McKinley Park following the parade. His great-grandmother came from Hallingdal, Norway, when the Midwest was being settled by Scandinavians. Sunday’s parade and festival commemorates the 149th anniversary of the adoption of the Norwegian Constitution in the village of Eidsvoll.”

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Jamie-Lynn Sigler
Evan Agostini/Invision
Giselle Fernandez
Willy Sanjuan/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include painter and sculptor Jasper Johns, who was born in 1930; former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, who was born in 1937; “My Favorite Year” star Lainie Kazan, who was born in 1940; Basketball Hall of Fame and former Knicks coach Don Nelson, who was born in 1940; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Brian Eno, who was born in 1948; “A Bronx Tale” star Chazz Palminteri, who was born in 1952; Baseball Hall of Famer George Brett, who was born in 1953; Spectrum News 1 anchor Giselle Fernandez, who was born in 1961; Baseball Hall of Famer John Smoltz, who was born in 1967; Pro Football Hall of Famer Emmitt Smith, who was born in 1969; and “The Sopranos” star Jamie-Lynn Sigler, who was born in 1981.

Chazz Palminteri
Greg Allen/Invision/AP

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A WIZARD WITH WORDS: L. Frank Baum was born in Chittenango, N.Y., on this day in 1856. Although “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz” is his most famous work, he also wrote many other books for children, including more than a dozen about Oz. He died in Hollywood in 1919.

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STOCKING UP: Nylon hose went on sale at stores throughout the country on this day in 1940. Competing producers bought their nylon yarn from E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Company (later DuPont). W.H. Carothers, of DuPont, developed Nylon, called “Polymer 66,” in 1935. It was the first totally manmade fiber. Over time it was substituted for other materials and came to have widespread application.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

Quotable:

“Art is much less important than life, but what a poor life without it.”
— Jasper Johns, who was born on this day in 1930

   


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