Brooklyn Boro

May 10: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

May 10, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1889, a Brooklyn Daily Eagle editorial said, “Our esteemed contemporary, the New York Times, is entitled to cordial congratulations on the completion of its new building. The structure is not only an architectural triumph, but a gratifying sign of the material progress attained by an enterprising, independent and honest public journal. The success of the Times furnishes convincing proof that the days of the old fashioned party organ are numbered. It has shown that independence of partisan control, while promotive of the general welfare, is also remunerative from the business standpoint. Beside ranking among the most outspoken exponents of enlightened opinion in the country, the Times is an excellent newspaper. While presenting the news of the day unostentatiously, its columns are noted for vigor of expression, accuracy of statement and amplitude of detail rarely surpassed or equaled in the journalism of the United States. Above and beyond all other considerations which commend the paper is its absolute freedom from obligation to the sinister influences which constantly seek to undermine the usefulness and impair the efficiency of the independent press. The allegiance of the Times, like that of other incorruptible journals, is not to the politicians, nor to any special interests, but to the people. That fidelity to the public interest is a paying investment is abundantly demonstrated by the splendid building which the Times has erected. The Eagle hopes that its contemporary will continue for many years in the enjoyment of its well-earned prosperity.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “The cloak of ‘security’ which kept the American people pretty much in the dark about President Roosevelt’s wartime travels was lifted today for President Truman. With the end of the war in Europe, the Office of Censorship informed newspaper and radio editors and broadcasters that they could now tell where the President has been, where he is and where he’s going. But they can’t tell the exact time he’s going somewhere, or by what route.” 

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “BERLIN (U.P.) — Russian authorities began lifting the Berlin blockade 40 hours before the deadline today when they restored electric power to parts of the Western sectors. The Soviet action gave American sector housewives unrationed electricity in the middle of the morning for the first time since power rationing was forced upon Western Berlin by the Soviet blockade July 9. Radios played and electric stoves glowed as the power flowed into American section lines from the Soviet sector. All of Berlin’s major power generating stations are in the Soviet sector. Restoration of power was started 40 hours before the official time set for ending the blockade — 12:01 a.m. Thursday (6:01 a.m. Brooklyn time Wednesday). Western authorities meanwhile instructed Lord Mayor Ernst Reuter to lift Allied counter-blockade measures against the Soviet zone at the same time. At that minute the first of 16 Allied trains a day will begin to roll into Berlin for the first time since the Russians cut off all surface transportation 11 months ago.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “BIRMINGHAM, ALA. (UPI) — Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. yesterday gave Birmingham an 11 a.m. deadline today to meet Negro civil rights demands or face new demonstrations. King told a news conference that ‘this is the last time we will set a deadline.’ One of his top aides, the Rev. Ralph Abernathy, added that ‘we must reach agreement by 9 a.m. today or demonstrations will resume.’ ‘We still are engaged in negotiations,’ King told a news conference after  morning-long sessions with white leaders and with his own people. King declined to discuss the specific points on which agreement had been reached but it was believed that they were at least partial desegregation of eating facilities and job upgrading for Negroes. ‘This is the largest demonstration for racial justice ever conducted and of course there are many problems involved,’ King said.”

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Bono
Web Summit/Wikimedia Commons

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Basketball Hall of Famer Jim Calhoun, who was born in 1942; “Airplane!” director Jim Abrahams, who was born in 1944; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Donovan, who was born in 1946; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Dave Mason (Traffic), who was born in 1946; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Bono (U2), who was born in 1960;

Missy Franklin
Oleg Bkhambri/Wikimedia Commons

supermodel Linda Evangelista, who was born in 1965; “Saturday Night Live” star Kenan Thompson, who was born in 1978; “Prodigal Son” star Halston Sage, who was born in 1993; swimmer and Olympic gold medalist Missy Franklin, who was born in 1995; and Memphis Grizzlies point guard Tyus Jones, who was born in 1996.

Kenan Thompson
Anders Krusberg/Wikimedia Commons

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DANCING DAYS: Fred Astaire was born on this day in 1899. The Nebraska native began dancing with his sister, Adele, and in the mid-1930s began to dance with Ginger Rogers. After his first Hollywood screen test, a producer noted of him: “Can’t act. Slightly bald. Can dance a little.” Despite this, Astaire starred in more than 40 films, including “Holiday Inn,” “Silk Stockings” and “Easter Parade.” He died in 1987.

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GETTING IN TUNE: Maybelle Carter was born on this day in 1909. The guitar/banjo-playing Virginia native founded the Carter Family — the first country music stars in the U.S. The group combined influences of folk, bluegrass, rural country and gospel. Their hits include “Wabash Cannonball” and “Will the Circle Be Unbroken.” Carter died in 1978.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

Quotable:

“We didn’t have any instruments, so I had to use my guitar.”
— musician Maybelle Carter, who was born on this day in 1909


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