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February 9: ON THIS DAY in 1934, Cold, at 14.3 below, sets record

February 9, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1861, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The Charleston Courier describes a Southern Confederacy flag designed by a Charlestonian, which is received with such general favor that it has been sent on to the Congress, now in session at Montgomery. It will receive the intelligent consideration of that body. Rattlesnakes are ignored, and the palmetto forms no part of the device. The ‘stars and stripes’ — the distinctive features of the United States flag — are preserved. Its original peculiarity is the ‘Southern Cross.’ The center of the flag is occupied by an azure cross, emblazoned with stars of the number of the pro-slavery States. Those acknowledged are to be added as the States, one after another, assert their sovereignty. The States that have already come out of the Union are represented by alternate red and white stripes, arranged horizontally.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1919, the Eagle reported, “William Robert Brown of 886 Steinway Ave., Long Island City, is one of the sailors at Deer Island, Boston, who have volunteered to be inoculated with influenza germs so that Navy physicians can study the disease. He is now undergoing the test at the quarantine station at Gallup’s Island, Boston Harbor. The volunteers compose what is known as the “Death Squad.” The tests began on February 4 with 50 sailors. Every man volunteered for inoculation, despite its known danger. If positive results are obtained, many of the volunteers will be stricken with influenza and some may even die.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1934, the Eagle reported, “The all-time cold record for New York City — in the 64 years the Weather Bureau has been established — was set at 7:25 a.m. today when the mercury dropped to 14.3 degrees below zero. The Weather Bureau’s official 14.3 below recording was exceeded at the New York Meteorological Laboratory at Central Park, which recorded 14.6 below at 7 a.m. Street thermometers in Park Row dived to 16 below at 7:30 a.m. Providentially, with a recession of the winds that had been blowing at moderate strength between midnight and 4 a.m. to nearly a vanishing point, the suffering and paralysis of transportation stood at a minimum, all things considered. The city administration, with Salvation Army coffee pots and armories throw open for the homeless for several days, appeared equal to the emergency. The Weather Bureau held out no promise for relief before tomorrow. Tonight will be continued cold, with the mercury in the below zero environs. Warmer weather, with slowly rising temperatures, is forecast for tomorrow.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — Congressional leaders today sought to coax aging justices off the Supreme Court bench in a desperate effort to stem opposition to President Roosevelt’s bill, giving him the power to appoint six new justices if none retires. Senator Joseph T. Robinson of Arkansas, the majority leader, proposed a compromise whereby the age limit in the President’s bill would be boosted from 70 to 75. This would affect three justices — Brandeis, Van Devanter and McReynolds — instead of six. Senator Tom Connally, D., Tex., today announced his opposition to the President’s plan for reorganization of the Supreme Court. The House took the lead in the movement after its Judiciary Committee members, according to information obtained by the Eagle, had examined the bill in executive session and had ‘not been impressed’ by the alleged court stacking feature. The House strategy will be to attempt to pass tomorrow the pending bill providing for the retirement of Justices over 70, with full pay, which is $20,000 for the Associate Justices and $20,500 for the Chief Justice … If McReynolds and Van Devanter, reported last year to be ready to quit, would retire, Mr. Roosevelt could have a six-to-three Liberal majority on the bench without increasing its membership.”


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