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November 13: ON THIS DAY in 1904, Will science soon be able to forecast volcanic eruptions?

November 13, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1860, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The question of the abstract right of secession is one which has never been thoroughly discussed. The framers of the Constitution made no provision for it and no provision against it. As the Grecian legislators refused to attach penalties to certain crimes, or even mention them in their statutes, because they were deemed such as human nature in its normal condition would never perpetrate, and their mention might suggest them to the morally depraved, so the founders of the Republic thought it unnecessary to stipulate pro or con with reference to a contingency which they could hardly contemplate as even among the remote possibilities of the far-distant future. Scarcely has a generation passed away, when the question comes up for practical solution, certain States claiming the right to withdraw, and threatening to put it into execution. Putting aside the abstract right of secession, the present aspect of the South demands attention, as it is fraught with immediate and important consequences to the country at large.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1904, the Eagle reported, “Recent eruptions of some of the great volcanoes have inspired renewed discussion of the subject by scientists in all parts of the world. The fear of repetitions of the disastrous outbreaks of the past and the efforts to forecast future outbreaks have made the subject one of intense interest. In the researches that have been made, and are still being made, mere academic investigation on the part of geological experts is a minor consideration, in view of the vital points to be achieved — the preservation of life and property … The United States Weather Bureau is arranging at Mount Weather to forecast the weather for one year. In Washington there is already in complete operation a department in which floods are accurately prognosticated, enabling whole communities to seek timely shelter, and resulting in the saving of millions of dollars of property annually. Certain scientific institutions are now working and, in fact, have been seeking for years methods of foretelling the eruption of volcanoes.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Eagle’s Washington bureau reported, “Representative Frederick C. Hicks of Long Island has introduced a bill to make November 11 a national holiday, to be known as Victory Day. Up to the present time Congress has never created a national holiday by legislation. It is Mr. Hicks’ idea that November 11, which marks the surrender of Germany, should always be celebrated in commemoration of the achievements of the American Army. His bill is as follows: ‘That in recognition of the glorious victory won for human liberty by the American forces in the conflict against Germany and her Allies and to perpetuate for all time the bravery, courage and valor of those forces, by which a complete and absolute victory was obtained, November 11 is hereby declared to be in each succeeding year a national holiday throughout the United States, its possessions and the territories thereof. That this national holiday shall be designated Victory Day.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1931, the Eagle reported, “Today is Friday the 13th. The Cunard line’s Aquitania, to avoid superstitious fears linked with this combination, will not sail until 1 minute after midnight tonight. The force of this concession to superstition is lessened by the fact that many ships customarily leave a few minutes after midnight, for various reasons, and that one of the vessels defying the Friday the 13th superstition by sailing during the day belongs to the same line, the Laconia. The Cosulich liner Vulcania is sailing at 15 minutes past midnight with H.G. Wells, writer.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1960, the Eagle reported, “The results in Brooklyn went just the way the Democrats expected them to, party leaders are claiming. County Chairman Joseph T. Sharkey, before he left for a vacation, credited the ‘strong organization which continues to grow even stronger’ for Sen. [John F.] Kennedy’s powerful showing and for the defeats of Republican Congressman Francis E. Dorn and Assemblyman Harry J. Donnell by Hugh L. Carey and Joseph J. Dowd. Sharkey, who had ‘been for Kennedy since the 1956 convention,’ said the ‘excellent job the party did justifies our election at Los Angeles.’”


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