Brooklyn Boro

August 4: ON THIS DAY in 1914, England sends ultimatum to Germany on Belgium

August 4, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1914, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Great Britain today sent a practical ultimatum to Germany demanding a satisfactory reply by midnight tonight on the subject of Belgian neutrality. The House of Commons today voted $525,000,000 for emergency purposes and passed several bills in five minutes without a dissenting voice. Germany’s reply to Sir Edward Grey’s speech, indicating the British attitude in regard to the violation of Belgian territory by Germany, was a second ultimatum from Berlin to Brussels, saying Germany was prepared to carry through her plans by force of arms if necessary. The British Government was officially informed by Belgium today that German troops had invaded Belgium, and that the violation of that country’s neutrality, which the British Foreign Secretary yesterday intimated must be followed by action on the part of the British, had become an accomplished fact. Definite announcement of Great Britain’s intentions under this grave affront was expected in the House of Commons this afternoon.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Eagle reported, “Conservative estimates based largely on The Eagle’s Military Index — the most complete of its kind in the country — show that the number of Brooklyn men in the United States service has now passed 100,000. This comprises more than 3 percent of the total armed forces of the country, now close to 3,000,000. At least 25,000 men from Long Island, outside of Kings County, are in arms, making a total for this section of 125,000. It is estimated that New York City’s Roll of Honor numbers 300,000. Of the 100,000 Brooklyn men in service, 65,000 are in France or in European waters. At least 25,000 of these and probably as many as 40,000 are now under fire or in close proximity to the battlefront. That Brooklyn has more than done its share in responding to the President’s call to arms is shown from the fact that the borough holds approximately 2 percent of the total population of the country, but nevertheless has furnished more than 3 percent of the Army, Navy and Marine Corps.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1921, the Eagle reported, “CHICAGO — One of the seven acquitted former White Sox players may bring suit to recover payment of salary that stopped when suspension followed exposure of the alleged sell-out in the 1919 World Series, it was indicated when Attorney Michael J. Ahern, who represented George ‘Buck’ Weaver in the trial of the players, declared his client has a legitimate claim in connection with his contract. While rumors of other suits were heard, these for the most part were denied, and it was believed that the other members of the now obsolete ‘Black Sox,’ delighted with the jury’s verdict, will content themselves as best they can with the aftermath verdict of those who control the game that they be barred forever from organized baseball. ‘Weaver’s contract,’ Mr. Ahern stated, ‘was to have run through the season of 1922. He probably will ask us to bring action to recover what is due him for 1921, less what he earned this year. If successful in this suit, we shall bring another action at the close of the 1922 season.’ Charles A. Comiskey, owner of the White Sox, declared he was ready for any action that might be brought. ‘They have all been paid every nickel they had coming,’ he said.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “BOSTON, MASS. (U.P.) — The virus that causes polio can now be grown and studied in the test tube, opening the way for an accelerated four-pronged attack on infantile paralysis. The accomplishment in itself by Harvard University’s Children’s Hospital scientists in developing a new technique to grow the virus outside the human body is great enough, but the ultimate gains may be even greater. The new work is being done by these investigators in the Research Division of Infectious Diseases, Children’s Medical Center, Boston, and is financed by funds from the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis. Scientists previously were able to grow the polio virus for a short time in a test tube, using nerve tissue for culture. The Children’s Hospital Research team, however, has now found that the virus will grow and multiply in a culture with other types of human tissue.”


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