Brooklyn Boro

May 5: ON THIS DAY in 1937, Baldwin begs strike peace for coronation

May 5, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “LONDON (AP) — Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin pleaded for industrial peace today ‘at this moment of the coronation’ as the London bus drivers’ strike threatened to spread. A delegation representing London’s 12,000 street car workers demanded permission from the Transport Union to join the walkout of 25,000 busmen, and a national coal strike threatened. As debate started in the House of Commons on the decision of Welsh and English miners to strike, Baldwin appealed ‘to the handful of men on whom rests peace or war to give the best present that could be given to the country at this moment of the coronation’ by settling their differences. The street car employees want the same objectives as striking busmen, a cut in their working day from 8 to 7 1/2 hours. London’s huge transportation system, already hard hit by the bus strike at the peak of pre-coronation traffic, would be further paralyzed by a street car strike … ‘The whole world has its eyes on London,’ Baldwin pleaded. ‘In Westminster Abbey in a week our young King and his Queen, called suddenly and unexpectedly to the most tremendous position on earth, will kneel and dedicate themselves to the service of their people.’” 

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — It was practically impossible at the War Department today to get high-ranking army officers to offer any better odds than 50-50 that Hitler is really dead. ‘You just can’t trust the son-of-a-gun, not even to die,’ was a reaction to the announcement of the Fuehrer’s demise by Heinrich Himmler and Adm. Karl Doenitz. Some of the officers, whose job was to study Hitler as closely as it is possible, doubted that he was capable of either committing suicide or dying a hero’s death. Hitler, they explained, was not the type who would ever concede he was wrong.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “LOUISVILLE (U.P.) — Assault, a good horse the crowd overlooked for no reason at all, came from behind today to win the Kentucky Derby before the largest crowd ever to jam into an American race track. The three horses the crowd numbering more than 100,000 picked as its favorite — the entry of the Main Chance Farm, Lord Boswell, Knockdown, Perfect Bahram — didn’t finish in the money. Spy Song was second as Hempden crowded out Lord Boswell in a near-photo finish for third place. It was the richest Derby in the history of America’s oldest and most cherished race. The purse was $100,000. Son of the Derby winner of ten years ago, Bold Venture, and himself the winner of the Wood Memorial, Assault attracted less attention than was due from the crowd attracted by the strapping colts of Mrs. Elizabeth Arden Graham, owner of Maine Chance, and sympathetic toward her cause because she lost 23 thoroughbreds worth $500,000 in a stable fire in Chicago a few days ago.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA (U.P.) – Reports that a ‘cigar-shaped object larger than any plane’ flashed across the southeast Australian sky just after dawn Saturday puzzled air force and civilian scientists today. At least 13 persons from four areas of New South Wales asserted they saw the mysterious object. Among them were two airline pilots and a Royal Australian Air Force officer who served during World War II. All of the sightings were within seven minutes of one another and ranged from Sydney to the south coast, 100 miles away, and Parkes, 200 miles west of Sydney. R.A.A.F. spokesmen said no jet planes were over any of the areas at the time specified. Weather Bureau officials said the object was ‘definitely not’ a weather balloon. Reg Edwards, one of three post office employees who reported sighting the phenomenon, asserted the object appeared to have many lighted windows, such as a ship at sea. ‘It was a long thing, like a ship or a submarine, and at least three or four times larger than a DC-4 Skymaster,’ he declared. ‘It made no sound as it flew at about 500 miles an hour. We were all convinced that it was not a meteor of any kind. We watched it for about a minute before it disappeared into a cloudbank.’”


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