Brooklyn Boro

February 7: ON THIS DAY in 1939, Labor War ties up IRT lines

February 7, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1939, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “A series of protest demonstrations by employees scheduled for discharge today snarled up rush-hour traffic on I.R.T. elevated and subway lines in Manhattan and Queens. The demonstrators, subway conductors, guards and motormen who are to be replaced by 6th Ave. ‘L’ employees with longer service yanked emergency stop cords, held subway doors open and, in one case, put a train of empty cars where it would keep others from passing. The stoppages, according to I.R.T. officials, occurred at ten points on the 2nd and 3rd Ave. elevated lines, two on the east side subway, Manhattan, and one in Queens — 13 in all. Police reported no trouble in Brooklyn.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1951, the Eagle reported, “On Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 17 and 18, the First Annual Blue Ribbon Invitational Tennis Tournament will be held at the Palm Springs Racquet Club … Among those expected to enter are Kirk Douglas, Cornel Wilde, Gilbert Roland, Lex Barker, Errol Flynn, Peter Lawford, Mickey Rooney, Dinah Shore, George Montgomery, Paul Henreid, Van Johnson, Frank Sinatra, Evelyn Keyes, Tony Martin, Jimmy Ritz, Dick Haymes, Dane Clark, Marguerite Chapman, Mark Stevens and Dean Jagger. Some of filmtown’s best tennisers aren’t on that list, but there’s still plenty of talent there.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “London, Feb. 7 (UP) — Queen Elizabeth II, dressed in black but showing no other sign of her sorrow, came home today to assume the British throne. The arrival of the girl who went away a week ago a Princess and returned a Queen climaxed a grueling 22-hour flight from Nairobi, Kenya, where yesterday she received the news of the death of King George VI. Her face calm and her bearing regal, the 25-year-old sovereign spent less than five minutes receiving Prime Minister Winston Churchill, her uncle, the Duke of Gloucester, and a dozen other of Britain’s ‘greats’ who were waiting for her at London airport. Each addressed her as ‘Your Majesty.’ The Queen spoke a few words to the captain and stewardess of the plane which rushed her home from East Africa and stepped into a gleaming limousine to be sped to London. There, Britain’s first Queen since Victoria faced among her first duties the arranging of the funeral of her father.”

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ON FEB. 8, 1980, the Home Reporter and Sunset News reported, “More than 300 residents turned out to greet the Olympic torch as the runner carried it off the Verrazano Bridge into Bay Ridge on Monday morning. The runner, delayed by crowds in New Jersey, arrived at 11 a.m., a half hour behind schedule … Two sixth grade classes from P.S. 104 on Gelston Avenue witnessed the runner’s arrival in Bay Ridge with special interest. The children, who are studying the history of ancient Greece, were able to watch an old legend come to life … ‘I think the children were impressed by it,’ said Mr. E. Richman, assistant principal of P.S. 104. ‘This is a once in a lifetime type of thing and it fit in perfectly with what they’re learning in school now.’”

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ON FEB. 9, 1950, the Eagle reported, “From the sound of the long, low wolf-whistles, you’d think Betty Grable was in the vicinity. But the smiling lads on crutches, in wheelchairs and on stretchers were just coming to their new home in Brooklyn — the ultra-modern, 16-story Fort Hamilton Veterans Hospital. The shining stainless steel walls, the great expanses of glass, the southern-exposed view over the entrance to New York Harbor — it was all quite a change from the Manhattan Beach Veterans Hospital they were leaving. On Sunday, the new $20,000,000 structure along the Belt Parkway in Fort Hamilton will be dedicated officially. Today, the first few patients were assigned their rooms. First man through the portals was former Marine Private First Class George J. Shaw of Hornell, N.Y. The handsome veteran, his black hair slicked back neatly for the nurses who greeted him, was wide-eyed and cheerful as he was wheeled through the halls … Shaw was severely wounded on Guam [on] July 1, 1944. He has been in hospitals ever since — in Seattle, the Brooklyn Naval Hospital, Manhattan Beach and now Fort Hamilton. ‘This is the best one yet,’ he said, admiring the view over the harbor.”


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