Brooklyn Boro

October 7: ON THIS DAY in 1927, Yankees lead Pirates, 2-0

October 7, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1915, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Washington — There will be no White House wedding. This was officially made known this morning, as a supplementary announcement to that of last night, when the fact was given that President [Woodrow] Wilson and Mrs. Norman Galt of this city would be married. The wedding, it is believed, will be at the home of Mrs. Galt, 1308 Twentieth street. The time will be about two months from today. The president and his fiancée will be seen in New York tomorrow, and in Philadelphia on Saturday. They have planned a couple of holidays in celebration of their engagement. They will leave Washington tomorrow morning, accompanied by Dr. Cary T. Grayson, the president’s physician; Miss Helen Woodrow Wilson Bones, the president’s niece; and Secretary [Joseph Patrick] Tumulty, and will go direct to New York, where they will be the guests of Colonel E.M. House. It is planned to visit a theater in the evening. On Saturday the presidential party will go to Philadelphia, where they will attend one of the games in the World’s Series between the Philadelphia Nationals and the Boston Red Sox. Both the president and Mrs. Galt take a great interest in the national game, and have been seen together at the ball park in Washington.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1916, the Eagle reported, “Braves Field, Boston, Mass. — It is conceded that baseball and poker are the two national games of Uncle Sam. The followers of both pastimes are exceedingly superstitious. They have the habit of finding hunches in the most trivial of incidents. That is why the members of the Brooklyn Rooters, headed by Borough President Lewis H. Pounds, are hailing as an omen of good luck the blue and white of the sky-canopy under which the Brooklyn Superbas, champions of the National League, and the Boston Red Sox, title holders of the American League, are battling in the opening game of the World’s Series this afternoon. The colors of the Brooklyn club are blue and white. Each fair member of the Brooklyn Rooters who fought her way — and fought is the only word that could possibly describe the attempt — into his mammoth amphitheater, the Braves’ Field, wore a broad band of blue, upon which was worked a big white ‘B.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1927, the Eagle reported, “Yankee Stadium — A full hour before today’s World Series game started, Babe Ruth stepped up to the plate and sloughed one into the right field bleachers for a home run. Thus the young man who lifts them with shoulders like a bear, known also as the Hoister of Homers and the Sultan of Sock, made the bleacherites completely happy and settled the one remaining question in this series. Nobody hereabouts wonders to whom the pennant will go, but, they ask, will the Babe come through? Well, technically, this was only a practice wallop, maybe — but he came through. For the bleacherites it was enough. This somewhat well-behaved crowd likes the Pirates, otherwise known as the Battling Buccaneers. A tremendous cheer greeted them from the throats of some 50,000 New Yorkers when they appeared on the field and another from perhaps 65,000 throats as they came to bat. ‘I’ll tell you how it is,’ explained the chief of the bleacherites, an honest New Yorker. ‘My money’s on the Yanks, but I’m not prejudiced. From all I can see, we couldn’t have a nicer gang of boys than the Pirates to play.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1941, the Eagle reported, “Groping for an explanation, we advanced a theory today to the Weather Man that perhaps the unseasonable heat had been generated by the World Series. ‘You’ve got something there,’ that baseball fan admitted cautiously. Today will be cooler, he promised, although the temperature will still be above normal. The high will be about 72 degrees and the day will be partly cloudy. Tomorrow will be warmer again. Yesterday was the hottest Oct. 6 in the 70-year history of the Weather Bureau, with the mercury at 89 degrees. Yesterday and Sunday were also the two hottest October days ever recorded by the Bureau.”

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