Brooklyn Boro

June 5: ON THIS DAY in 1944, allies occupy Rome, chase Germans north

June 5, 2019 Brooklyn Eagle

ON THIS DAY IN 1850, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The Latest from California. — New Orleans, June 3, 1850.  — The Alabama brings 82 passengers, and $62,000 in gold dust. Over $1,000,000 in gold dust were received by the steamer Panama, Capt. Bailey, at Panama, on the 21st ult. An immense emigration were starting for the mines.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1893, the Eagle reported, “New Bedford, Mass., June 5 — The long anticipated Borden murder trial has begun. At an early hour this morning, every available shady spot on County street near the courthouse was pre-empted, and patiently the sitters and standers waited until the bell on the courthouse was tolled, signifying the opening of court. Deputy sheriffs guarded the entrance at the front and New Bedford policemen were at the rear. The talesman began to file into their places at 10 o’clock and at 11 all were there and were checked off, given numbers by the clerk, and awaited the coming ordeal with becoming fortitude. At precisely 10:58, Miss Lizzie A. Borden, the prisoner, came slowly into the room, preceded by Deputy Sheriff Kirby, and was shown to her seat in the dock.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1915, the Eagle reported, “Tiflis, Transcausia, Thursday, June 3 (via Petrograd and London, June 5) — After the occupation by the Russians of Van, Turkish Armenia, bands of Kurds continued to commit atrocities in the districts of Bitlis, Mush and Diarbekr. Armenian volunteers in increasing numbers are fighting desperately to protect the Christian population from the Kurds. The population of Urumiah, in Persian Armenia, greeted the Russians with enthusiasm. Food for the refugees in the Armenian missions was brought by the Russians. The success of the Russians in these districts is creating disaffection among the Persians and Arabians. Disorders are developing.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “Allied Headquarters, Naples, June 5 (UP) — The 5th Army completed the occupation of Rome, first Axis-held capital in Europe to be liberated, and swept on without pause across the Tiber River today in close pursuit of German forces fleeing in disorder toward a new defense line possibly 150 miles to the north. American tank and infantry vanguards already were streaming north of Rome under orders to annihilate the enemy armies when Allied headquarters announced the triumphant liberation of the religious capital of the world in a special communique on the 271st day of the Italian campaign. ‘Troops of the 5th Army occupied Rome on the night of June 4-5,’ the communique said. ‘Leading elements have passed through the city and are across the Tiber in some places.’ Adolf Hitler was reported by the official German news agency DNB to have ordered his forces to withdraw northwest of Rome to avoid drawing the ancient capital into the battle area. The clandestine radio Atlantic said the Germans were rushing three divisions from southern France and two others from northern Italy in an attempt to stem the Allied tide.”

***

DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

ON THIS DAY IN 1963, Eagle sports columnist Jim Murray wrote, “There was the point to be made — and someone made it — that as soon as one American came along on the summit of Everest, others soon came along and began to spoil it as a tourist attraction. The next sound we may expect to hear from the top of Everest is ‘Everybody out of the pool!’ You know how Americans are abroad. They travel halfway round the world and there, standing on a street corner in Hula shirt and dark glasses, are their next-door neighbors. And four Americans narrowly missed bumping into each other on the top of Everest the other day. As it was, they met just underneath the ridge and we may expect all sorts of calamitous eventualities. One American will say to another, consulting his watch, ‘I’ll meet you for lunch just underneath the West Ridge. You know the spot, there’s a newsstand on the northwest edge. Shall we say ‘Noonish?’ Or one Abominable Snowman will sit saying ruefully to another A.S., ‘This used to be such a nice place till the Americans took over.’ We may expect signs plastered all over the Himalayas, ‘Ami, Go Home!’”

Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment