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MILESTONES: June 26, birthdays for Ariana Grande, Nick Offerman, Aubrey Plaza

June 26, 2018 Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Ariana Grande. Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP
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Greetings, Brooklyn.  Today is the 176th day of the year.

On this day in 1917, as American Expeditionary Forces were arriving overseas, it was announced, “The Eagle’s Paris office is equipped to be of great service to the Brooklyn boys in France. The Bureau is at 53 Rue Cambon, corner of Boulevard Madeleine, one of the most central locations in Paris. The entire second floor of the building is occupied by the Eagle and the leading American newspapers. The manager, Naboth Hedin, assisted by his wife, will do all in their power to assist all Brooklyn and Long Island boys. The office can be used as a meeting place, and letters can be sent there. If the soldiers notify Mr. Hedin of their location, the Eagle will be able to help parents communicate with their sons. This Bureau service is freely offered to all Eagle readers.”

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On this day in 1906, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Harry Kendall Thaw, a Pittsburg millionaire, brother of the Countess of Yarmouth and husband of the beautiful actress Florence Evelyn Nesbit, is locked up in the Tombs for killing Stanford White, the famous architect, in view of several hundred persons at the Madison Square Room Garden last night … The motive for the killing was blurted out by Thaw early this morning before he saw his lawyer. He shot White because of his wife, Evelyn Nesbit Thaw, whose marriage to Thaw last year added to the international notoriety she and Thaw had already gained … A member of the Eagle staff who attended the performance at the Madison Square Garden last night and witnessed the murder of White [said], ‘Thaw never gave the man at the table a chance for his life. White had not been able to lift a finger to save himself.’”

 

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On this day in 1918, the Eagle reported, “In an attack upon the German lines on the Marne front last night the American troops extended their line northwest of Belleau Wood. Up to 10 o’clock this morning, 216 prisoners had been counted, together with a number of machine guns and other booty. Additional prisoners are coming in. The Americans are now in possession of virtually all the valuable tactical positions in the Belleau Wood sector.”

 

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On this day in 1927, the Eagle reported, “The Humane Society, although it has lost the first round of the battle to prevent bullfights at the Coney Island Stadium on July 2, 3 and 4, will continue its opposition, even though it has been announced that Fernando Romero Garcia of Mexico City has obtained a license to conduct the show from the Commissioner of Licenses. The local superintendents and Human Society general manager were out of town yesterday afternoon, but the men left in charge were emphatic in their declaration that the society would not ‘stand for’ any bullfights in Coney Island or any other place in New York City.”

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On this day in 1948, the Eagle reported, “Berlin, June 26 (U.P.) — American planes began flying milk and medical supplies into Berlin today to ease the plight of 2,500,000 Germans victimized by a Russian attempt to drive the western allies out of the city … The powdered and canned milk being brought in by air was reported earmarked for the 6,000 or so babies in the western quarter. The medical supplies were for German hospitals in the Allied sectors.”

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On this day in 1950, the Eagle reported, “Seoul, Tuesday, June 27 (U.P.) — Tank-led North Korean Communist armies drove to within four miles of this capital city of South Korea early today and reports from the front said Republican defense forces were able to put up ‘almost no resistance.’ The U.S. Army in Japan canceled some of its flights to Seoul today because of the ‘deteriorating situation’ there. The cancellation suggested that Kimpo Air Field outside Seoul might have fallen to the Communists … The American Mission in Korea began burning its secret documents. Arrangements were made to evacuate its women members as quickly as possible.”

It was also reported, “Spain, ranked as a strong title contender, defeated the weak United States team 3-1 as the 1950 world soccer championships got under way in four Brazilian cities yesterday … The lightly regarded Americans threw a scare into the Spanish combine, however, before going down to defeat. Joseph Gaetjens scored a goal that gave the U.S. team a 1-0 lead at the end of the first half.”

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NOTABLE PEOPLE born on this day include director and screenwriter PAUL THOMAS ANDERSON, who was born in 1970; singer and actress ARIANA GRANDE, who was born in 1993; actor SEAN P. HAYES, who was born in 1970; singer, musician and actor CHRIS ISAAK, who was born in 1956; former baseball player DEREK JETER, who was born in 1974; former cyclist GREG LeMOND, who was born 1961; actress JENNETTE McCURDY, who was born in 1992; actor CHRIS O’DONNELL, who was born in 1970; actor NICK OFFERMAN, who was born in 1970; former football player CHAD PENNINGTON, who was born in 1976; actress AUBREY PLAZA, who was born in 1984; actor JASON SCHWARTZMAN, who was born in 1980; sportscaster and Hall of Fame football player SHANNON SHARPE, who was born in 1968; and country singer GRETCHEN WILSON, who was born in 1973.

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THE BAR CODE WAS INTRODUCED ON THIS DAY IN 1974. A committee formed in 1970 by U.S. grocers and food manufacturers recommended in 1973 a Universal Product Code for supermarket items that would allow electronic scanning of prices. On this day in 1974 a pack of Wrigley’s gum was swiped across the first checkout scanner at a supermarket in Troy, Ohio.

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ABNER DOUBLEDAY WAS BORN ON THIS DAY IN 1819. He served in the U.S. Army during the Mexican War and the Seminole War in Florida prior to his service in the American Civil War. His service found him at the battles of Second Bull Run, Antietam and Fredericksburg, and as a major general he commanded a division at Gettysburg. A commission set up by sporting goods manufacturer Albert Spalding to investigate the origins of baseball credited Doubleday with inventing the game in 1839. Subsequent research has debunked the commission’s finding. Doubleday died in New Jersey in 1893.

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“HARRY POTTER AND THE PHILOSOPHER’S STONE” WAS PUBLISHED ON THIS DAY IN 1997. Bloomsbury published the acclaimed children’s fantasy book by J.K. Rowling in the United Kingdom with an initial hardcover print run of 500 copies. The first book in a seven-title series, it became a smash hit almost overnight. The seventh title, “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows,” was published in 2007. The books — which became a blockbuster film series — have been translated into 69 languages and have sold more than 450 million copies.

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THE BROOKLYN HISTORICAL SOCIETY will host “Sex vs. Spirit: LGBTQ & Communities of Faith” tonight at 6:30 p.m. As biblical interpretations and cultural norms broaden, leading a life of faith and sexual nonconformity are no longer diametrically opposed. NYU professor and coauthor of “Love the Sin: Sexual Regulation and the Limits of Religious Tolerance” Ann Pellegrini will moderate a conversation with Malcolm Shanks of the Muslim Alliance for Sexual and Gender Diversity, Jewish writer and activist Adam Eli Werner and transgender pastor Paula Williams on the intersection of religious community and personal identity, and in some cases, the ongoing challenges of existing as a dual minority. For more information, visit brooklynhistory.org.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

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“Make all your decisions based on how hilarious it would be if you did it.” — actress Aubrey Plaza, who was born on this day in 1984

 


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