Greenpoint

Three acclaimed authors to read at Greenpoint bookstore event

Brooklyn BookBeat

April 29, 2015 Brooklyn Daily Eagle
Megan Abbott. Photo by Drew Reilly

Authors Nathan Larson, Stacy Wakefield and Megan Abbott will read at a program at WORD Bookstore, 126 Franklin St., Greenpoint, at 7 p.m. on Thursday, May 14.

The event will also mark the release of Larson’s “The Immune System,” the third installment of his Dewey Decimal crime-fiction series; Wakefield’s new novel, “The Sunshine Crust Baking Factory”; and the paperback edition of Abbott’s “The Fever.”

Larson is an award-winning composer, with more than 30 film scores to his name, and musician as well as a novelist. His protagonist, Dewey Decimal, has been hailed as “one of the more offbeat characters in fiction” (Booklist) and “an unlikely hero, a gimpy, smart-mouthed loner . . . His indomitable spirit and his distinctive ghetto-infused, educated patter give Larson’s series its unique and spicy character” (Publishers Weekly). His trilogy featuring the detective is hailed by Kirkus as “one of the most unique hard-boiled arcs in recent memory.”

Wakefield is perhaps best known for her underground classic about squatting, “Not for Rent: Conversations with Creative Activists in the U.K.” “The Sunshine Crust Baking Factory” is a fictionalized take on the world of Lower East Side and Brooklyn squatting, circa 1995, that Wakefield knows intimately, having lived through it. Wakefield’s heroine is witty, outspoken, independent, creative and a little too bright-eyed and bushy-tailed to fit in at the Lower East Side squats. She treks out to pre-gentrified Williamsburg to squat in the abandoned Sunshine Crust Baking Factory, learning more about herself in the process.

Abbott’s “The Fever” was named one of the best books of 2014 by Amazon, Kirkus Reviews, the LA Review of Books, NPR and many more publications. Janet Maslin at The New York Times called it “the book to beat … in the ‘Is it the next Gone Girl?’ sweepstakes,” and “Gone Girl” author Gillian Flynn herself declared it “a mesmerizing, modern portrait of teenage life today.”

 

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