Brooklyn Boro

May 6: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

May 6, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1861, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “A splendid flag and staff, surmounted by an eagle, was last evening presented to the reserve of Company D, 13th Regiment, at the Arsenal, by Sergeant Brokeau, who with orderly Sergeant Coleman, are in temporary command, until the reserve reaches headquarters at Annapolis. Capt. Hill made the presentation in a spirit-stirring address, which was responded to by Capt. Stone. Quite a crowd of ladies and gentlemen were present, and entered with much enthusiasm into the spirit of the presentation, and the banner was saluted with three times three thundering cheers. The balance of Company D, eighty-one in number, attended divine service in St. John’s Church, which was crowded on Sabbath morning. The front seats were reserved for the gallant defenders of the flag.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1910, the Eagle reported, “LONDON — A bulletin issued late this afternoon by King Edward’s physicians says that his majesty’s symptoms became worse during the day, and the King’s condition now is critical. The bulletin was issued from Buckingham Palace at 6:18 p.m. It was signed by Doctors Laking, Reid, Powell and Dawson. ‘Well, it is all over, but I think I have done my duty.’ These words fell from the lips of King Edward VII in a waking interval late this afternoon. Gloom has settled over the city and provinces following the issuance of tonight’s distressing bulletin. The Archbishop of Canterbury telegraphed to all the Bishops of England and Wales this afternoon as follows: ‘Prayers by the Church and people of England are desired on behalf of His Majesty King Edward in his grave illness.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1933, the Eagle reported, “The financial status of this city is receiving more attention by the voters than it has since the days of the defeat of ‘Boss’ Tweed, Sidney Kuntz, executive member of the Young Folks Democratic League of Kings County, told members of the group meeting last night at headquarters, 118 Livingston St. The recovery of business in New York, and to some degree throughout the surrounding country, hinges on the people’s decision in the coming election for mayor, he declared. ‘Beer has already proven an incentive to business and from this we can gather what the repeal of the Eighteenth Amendment will mean toward establishing us on firmer financial ground,’ he said, and urged the members to work actively to bring out a heavy vote for repeal on May 23.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (A.P.) — Senator Bridges (R., N.H.) cited Indiana, Iowa and Missouri today as states where Democratic senators opposing the Roosevelt court bill may obtain Republican aid in 1938 elections. Senators Van Nuys (D., Ind.), Gillette (D., Ia.) and Clark (D., Mo.), foes of the court measure, are among 32 senators coming up for re-election next year. Bringing party alignment talk at the Capitol to the surface, Bridges said possibilities of new organizations were being considered both by groups that believe administration policies go too far and groups that would go farther. ‘If the Republican Party is to be the vehicle which thoughtful people can use against the New Deal, it must develop a positive program — something it has not done since the election,’ the 38-year-old New Englander said in an interview. Bridges, who has been in touch with state leaders on speaking trips through the East and Midwest, added: ‘I have certainly been approached by several groups of leaders in both major parties for discussion of either a coalition of Republicans and ‘Constitutional Democrats’ or a new party with the present Republican Party as a nucleus.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Eagle reported, “New Yorkers today awaited the German dirigible Hindenburg, which is due to dock at Lakehurst, N.J. at 6 p.m. It was due to arrive over the city at 3 o’clock. Delayed by headwinds off the Newfoundland coast, the giant airship was 12 hours behind schedule. She originally was due to fly over the city at dawn today. Capt. Max Pruss indicated he would fly the ship above Manhattan briefly and then head for Lakehurst.”

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Gabourey Sidibe
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Baseball Hall of Famer Willie Mays, who was born in 1931; U.S. Sen. Richard Shelby, who was born in 1934; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Bob Seger, who was born in 1945; “Lost” star Alan Dale, who was born in 1947;

Willie Mays
Evan Vucci/AP

Emmy-winner Lynn Whitfield, who was born in 1953; “Touched by an Angel” star Roma Downey, who was born in 1960; Oscar-winner George Clooney, who was born in 1961; Olympic gold medalist and Hockey Hall of Famer Martin Brodeur, who was born in 1972; New York Jets Pro Bowler John Abraham, who was born in 1978; swimmer and Olympic gold medalist Brooke Bennett, who was born in 1980; “Empire” star Gabourey Sidibe, who was born in Brooklyn in 1983; and Olympic gold medalist and NBA All-Star Chris Paul, who was born in 1985.

Roma Downey
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

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“OH, THE HUMANITY!”: The Hindenburg disaster took place on this day in 1937. The dirigible exploded at 7:20 p.m. as it approached the mooring mast at Lakehurst, N.J., after a transatlantic voyage. Of its 97 passengers and crew, 36 died in the accident, which ended the dream of mass transportation via dirigible.

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HOPE OF A NATION: Bob Hope performed his first USO show on this day in 1941. The beloved entertainer made 57 tours for the organization over the next 50 years and was declared an honorary veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces in 1997. He received the Congressional Gold Medal in 1963 and the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1969. He died in 2003, two months after celebrating his 100th birthday.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

Quotable:

“Maybe I was born to play ball. Maybe I truly was.”
— Willie Mays, who was born in this day in 1931


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