Brooklyn Boro

April 1: ON THIS DAY in 1917, Safety of United States is in war

April 1, 2021 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1917, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Tomorrow the Sixty-fifth Congress will meet in extraordinary session to consider the gravest question that has confronted this country since the Civil War. The general belief in Washington is that President Wilson will ask the Congress to either declare war against Germany or declare that a state of war already exists between Germany and the United States. It is to be assumed from the reports of the Washington correspondents that this country in a few days — perhaps in a few hours — will be actually at war with Germany, no matter which form is used. Despite all the Imperial German Government has done to force the Government of the United States into war, the pacifists are still crying for peace — peace at any price. But could the United States have peace, even if every man, woman and child in the country were in favor of peace?”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1940, the Eagle reported, “The Rangers, resuming their rousing ride in quest of the Stanley Cup, which they haven’t owned since 1933, hope to turn loose tomorrow night two expert cracksmen who’ve lost considerable caste lately. Neil Colville and Bryan Hextall are the two deft gents referred to. The Bruin net couldn’t have baffled this pair more during the six-game series just ended if it had been the U.S. Treasury vaults. They didn’t find the combination once. The Toronto cage, however, is an open book to Neil and Hex, who were the leading Ranger blasters against the Leafs in eight games this year, of which the Leafs won only one. Hextall had four goals, the elder Colville three. Hextall and Colville are looking ahead to brighter days. In fact, the Rangers regard the Leafs as a cream-puff dish after their bitter diet of Boston hardtack.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1951, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — President Truman today authorized the deferment of college students from the draft, either on the basis of aptitude tests or high ranking in their class. The object of the move was to make certain the nation has a steady supply of scientists and other technically trained people available through its colleges and universities. There are about 1,000,000 college students eligible now for the draft. The President’s order left to Draft Director Lewis B. Hershey both the fixing of the aptitude ratings and the percentage of the students getting high marks who might be let off from military service. The new orders replace present deferments now allowed to college students only until the end of a school year after becoming eligible. It means many brighter and better qualified students can go an extra year or perhaps finish their college work.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “Herbert R. O’Brien, director of New York City’s Civil Defense, today was trying to figure out how to evacuate 8,000,000 men, women and children in the event the city is threatened by an H-bomb attack. ‘We hardly know where to start,’ he said. ‘If this new bomb is what they say it is, our system of going to shelters is ancient history.’ The only answer, O’Brien said, is total evacuation, and he estimated at least three days would be needed to accomplish that. It is ‘unlikely,’ he pointed out, that the city would get much warning. But advance studies of evacuation problems have already been made, he revealed. They show mass evacuation must be directed northward through Westchester County, he said. Mass movements to the west would be impossible because of bridge and tunnel bottlenecks and the fact that New Jersey’s industrial areas would also be a prime target.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1963, the Eagle reported, “Nearly a year and a half early, Republicans are asking themselves who their next presidential candidate is to be. Rockefeller and Goldwater are the big names … In recent months, Governor Rockefeller has held a strong lead in public-opinion polls. As this writer mentioned in one of these columns, Senator Goldwater has tended to feel that he lacked sufficient financial backing and really organized support to justify campaigning actively for the nomination, even though he is favored, by and large, by Republican regulars. But just now the nomination is teetering in Goldwater’s favor.”


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