Brooklyn Boro

October 20: ON THIS DAY in 1944, 250,000 Yanks hurl back Philippine Japs

October 20, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1884, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Young Mr. [Theodore] Roosevelt, who recently quitted his cattle ranch in Dakota, alighted last Saturday night in the Brooklyn Rink, where he made a speech an hour and a half long in opposition to Governor [Grover] Cleveland. Mr. Horace White, in a neatly turned letter published by the New York Times today, says that after the nomination of Mr. [James G.] Blaine on the 6th of June, he was writing a telegram from Chicago to Mr. [Edwin L.] Godkin as to ‘the proper policy to be pursued by the Evening Post,’ when young Mr. Roosevelt entered the room. The legislative reformer was asked whether the writer of the telegram had made it strong enough, and answered, ‘No; I think you have not. If I were writing, it I would say, ‘Any proper Democratic nomination will have our hearty support.’ Mr. White adds that ‘Mr. Roosevelt at that time considered Governor Cleveland’s nomination not only a proper ‘Democratic nomination’ but the most proper one then talked of.’ It would be interesting to know by what line of meditation on the Western plains the young reformer arrived at a different conclusion.” 

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ON THIS DAY IN 1912, the Eagle reported, “Some six thousand persons tried to get into the Brooklyn Academy of Music last night to hear Governor Woodrow Wilson, the Democratic candidate for President, make his first campaign speech in Brooklyn. About three thousand got in and heard Wilson attack the alliance between corrupt business and politics. Maud Malone, the suffragette, performed one of her usual stunts during the early part of the evening, interrupting Governor Wilson’s speech by asking about ‘votes for women,’ and deliberately inviting ejection after Wilson had answered her. She was carried out of the building and locked up on a charge of disorderly conduct, at the instance of Chief Magistrate Otto Kempner, who warned her to take her seat after she had held up the meeting for about ten minutes.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1918, the Eagle reported, “The political campaign begins tomorrow. Republican and Democratic candidates, who by common consent refrained from canvassing for the last three weeks in order to devote their time and energies to the Liberty Loan drive, will begin their stumping trips tomorrow and for the remaining two weeks and a day before Election Day (November 5), they will try to make up in intensity of their effort whatever ground has been lost by the shortened period for campaigning. The plans of both the Republican and Democratic State candidates [was] for extensive trips through the up-State this week with big mass meetings in all the cities, but the prevalence of influenza and pneumonia has wrecked their plans. Governor [Charles Seymour] Whitman, the Republican candidate, has abandoned his campaign in its entirety. He will travel through the up-State some and talk probably at open-air meetings; the remainder of the time he will devote to New York City. Al Smith, the Democratic gubernatorial nominee, will attempt to carry on his up-State campaign the best he can. It will probably consist chiefly of open-air meetings.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “GENERAL MacARTHUR’S HEADQUARTERS, LEYTE, PHILIPPINES (U.P.) — Gen. Douglas MacArthur today led an army of possibly 250,000 men back to the Philippines in a 600-ship armada, the greatest of the Pacific war, and drove inland on Leyte Island to within gunshot of the excellent Tacloban airfield against light Japanese resistance. MacArthur himself stepped onto Philippine soil in the bright sunlight only a few hours after thousands of American assault troops swarmed ashore under cover of the greatest naval bombardment yet to blast the Japanese. Veteran jungle troops, including every living survivor of MacArthur’s epic journey from Bataan and Corregidor, landed on the 75-mile east coast of Leyte Island, in the central Philippines … As he returned to the islands, MacArthur broadcast to the Philippines people the fulfillment of his pledge made when he arrived in Australia from Corregidor: ‘I have returned. By the grace of God almighty, our force stands on Philippine soil, soil consecrated in the blood of our two people.’”


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