Brooklyn Boro

August 12: ON THIS DAY in 1945, Japan may keep emperor but under control of Allied commander, enemy is told

August 12, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1892, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The Fall River police have arrested Lizzie Borden. Whatever the force of the testimony so far taken, this was to have been expected. Some people are already saying that she has been thus formally subjected to official suspicion in regard to the double murder because nobody else has been found who could be implicated in the crime. If this is true, it at least furnishes ground for the action of the police. Of course no defendant could be convicted without something more, but even imperfect suspicion supplies full warrant for holding the suspected person until all the resources of investigation have been exhausted. Miss Borden’s relationship to the murdered man and woman, her close companionship with them while their lives were largely secluded, her admitted presence near the scene of the crime about them time when it was committed, her own account of its discovery by herself – all this, without inquiring at all into the matter of motive, forbids her enlargement until whatever may be described as the detective work of the case has been completed. Assuming her innocence, these are circumstances which she must face, together with whatever argument may be drawn from them.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Eagle reported, “BOSTON — Charles Ponzi, whose spectacular career as an investment banker was cut short by the authorities, today surrendered to the United States Marshal and was placed under arrest. He was charged with having used the mails in a plan to defraud. With state action against him expected, the young Italian financier turned a trick by putting himself in the custody of the federal authorities at the moment that the state police were petitioning a municipal court judge to issue a warrant for his arrest. Ponzi apparently was alive to what was imminent and, leaving his Lexington Ave. home early this afternoon, hurried to the office of the marshal and asked to be taken into custody.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — By cable and radio the Allied powers informed beaten Japan tonight that she may keep her emperor for the time being but he and the government and people will be subject alike to a supreme Allied commander who will accept and enforce unconditional surrender. Meanwhile White House Press Secretary Charles G. Ross announced at 6 p.m. that the White House would have no further Japanese surrender news tonight … V-J Day was imminent — perhaps no more than 72 hours away — because Japan has no alternative to abject acceptance. And, it was confidently expected here, the supreme commander who will accept Japanese surrender will be General of the Army Douglas MacArthur … Few doubted it would be the man who promised when he left the Philippines under orders to Australia in 1942: ‘I shall return.’” 

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — The Navy said last night that World War III — if and when — will be a push button, Buck Rogers type of war with pilotless rockets carrying atomic warheads whizzing through the air thousands of miles an hour to ‘sniff out’ targets. Capt. Steadman Teller, chief of the Navy’s guided missile section, reported the Navy now has weapons ‘that would have seemed fantastic even to a highly imaginative comic-strip artist a few years ago.’ An intensive program to develop guided missiles was undertaken on the realization that the giant U.S. Fleet that swept Japan from the Pacific would be inadequate in a few years’ time to defend the United States.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “ATLANTA (U.P.) — A noted brain specialist was summoned today in effort to save the life of Margaret Mitchell, who was critically injured last night while crossing the street frequented by Scarlett O’Hara in the pages of her fabulous novel, ‘Gone With the Wind.’ Dr. George F. Dowman, Atlanta brain specialist, was called in as Miss Mitchell lay in a state of semi-coma at Grady Memorial Hospital. A careening automobile, operated by an off-duty taxicab driver, Hugh D. Gravatt, bore down on the famous author last night as she and her husband were crossing Peachtree Street to attend a movie. Gravatt was charged with drunken driving.”


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