Brooklyn Boro

July 29: ON THIS DAY in 1940, F.D.R. demands power now to call up National Guard

July 29, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Rumors that Charles Ponzi, the Boston high financier who is reputed to have amassed a fortune of $9,000,000 in a few weeks, will open an office in New York have not been confirmed, and in the meantime the U.S. District Attorney in Manhattan is keeping close watch over the possibility of his coming here. A question that neither officials nor laymen have been able to figure out as yet, in connection with his startling entry into the financial world is: Who is losing the money that Ponzi has made?”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1938, the Eagle reported, “’The Adventures of Robin Hood,’ with Errol Flynn in the title role, is the feature currently playing at Loew’s Bay Ridge Theater. Olivia de Havilland and Basil Rathbone are seen in prominent roles.” De Havilland, who won two Academy Awards for Best Actress (“To Each His Own,” “The Heiress”) and was the last surviving cast member of “Gone With the Wind,” died on July 26. She was 104.

DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1940, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — President Roosevelt, saying he was ‘now convinced that the security of the nation’ demanded it, asked Congress today to let him order the National Guard and the Officers Reserve Corps into ‘intensive training.’ ‘I cannot, with clear conscience, longer postpone this vitally essential step,’ the President said in a letter read to the Senate. ‘This group of men who of necessity must be among the first to fight in the nation’s defense have a right to the best preparation that time and circumstance permit,’ he added after noting that ‘we know too well the tragedy that ensues when inadequately trained men are assailed by a more skillful adversary.’ While the President did not mention in his letter any specific period of active training for the Guard, the draft of accompanying legislation would specifically limit such training to one year. The extraordinary authority which would be given the President would expire June 30, 1942, under terms of the proposed measure. Service of the guardsmen would be restricted to the Western Hemisphere except for possessions of the United States and the Philippine Islands.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, ‘Simple, ordinary people who yesterday started a routine workday emerged as heroes of the tragic crash of an army bomber into the Empire State Building. A 49-year-old Queens businessman hacked through a plaster and tile wall when he and two others were trapped by flames in his office. The former head of the Brooklyn unit of the Civilian Air Patrol made his way to the wreckage on the 79th floor and assisted to safety countless burned victims, including one young woman who was trapped in a room near the spot where the plane crashed. Two girl clerks for hours worked to calm the hysterical and treat the burns of victims … Archbishop Francis J. Spellman said tonight that New York, ‘still aching from the grief of war, suffered a new and terrifying sorrow when the Empire State was gored by an army bomber.’”

***


ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “LONDON (U.P.) — King George VI officially opened the 14th Olympiad today in a scene of pomp and splendor. Standing in the royal box, a blue-fenced enclosure bearing the royal insignia in gold, the King said: ‘I proclaim open the Olympic games of London celebrating the fourteenth Olympiad of the modern era.’ Then at 4:07 p.m., 22-year-old John Mark of Britain ran into the Olympic arena bearing the traditional Olympic torch to the royal box. The sight of the flaming torch sent the crowd into roaring cheers. Dressed in the blue uniform of Admiral of the Fleet and flanked by Queen Elizabeth and Princess Margaret Rose, the king addressed the approximate 6,000 athletes from 59 nations and the estimated crowd of 75,00 spectators after a half-hour parade up Olympic way to Wembley Stadium. Flags of each of the 59 competing nations fluttered on each side of the Olympic Way, a six-lane thoroughfare resurfaced for the games … The picture was far different from the last Olympic Games at Berlin in 1936. Then Adolf Hitler personally led his goose-stepping Germans in the opening ceremony, with Japan playing a major role. Outbreak of the war prevented the scheduled Olympics in 1940 and 1944.”


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment