Brooklyn Boro

July 15: ON THIS DAY in 1940, Draft-Roosevelt drive on

July 15, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1863, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Mr. S.M. Giddings, a delegate of the Christian association of Brooklyn, just returned from the battlefield of Gettysburg, furnishes us with the following interesting particulars in relation to the great battle: The commission has been at work among the wounded since the battle, and the 14th regiment [Brooklyn] was particularly attended to by them, although others were not neglected. They found all of the 14th doing well, except John Weston, whose arm had been amputated and was in a dying state. Some dozen or so had suffered amputation, but everyone was in good spirits, and are with those less badly injured in a fair way of recovery. All speak in the highest terms of the 14th as to their bearing and gallantry.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1920, the Eagle reported, “Attendance at major league baseball games this year remains one of the remarkable features of the season. All records for each big league will be shattered so far that previous figures will look small, and the increase has come in the face of an increase in admission fees, mounting roughly to 10 percent. It is safe to say that the Brooklyn Superbas drew in four days in St. Louis on their second Western trip more than they drew in the 11 games on three trips last year. In fact, a good guess is that the cash returns on those four games, beginning July 8, 1920, exceeded the total receipts of the Brooklyn club in St. Louis for 1919 and 1918.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1940, the Eagle reported, “CHICAGO — Barring an eleventh hour change, President Roosevelt today stands ready to accept renomination, which the Democratic National Convention is ready to place at his disposition. Unless every sign fails, President Roosevelt will emerge from his party’s national convention, which convened today, as the first two-term occupant of the White House to shatter precedent and engage in the race for a third term. The consensus here is that there no longer is any doubt concerning the President’s willingness to make the run. If information available here is correct, Mr. Roosevelt is entirely willing to meet Wendell L. Willkie, the Republican nominee, in the national campaign, and entertains no doubt of his ability to win, although the margin may be quite different from that of 1936, when Mr. Roosevelt swept all but two of the 48 states.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “Washington, July 15 (U.P.) — Gen. John J. Pershing, 87, leader of the American army in World War I, died shortly before dawn today after a long battle against the complicated illnesses of old age. Death came to the nation’s highest ranking soldier at 3:50 a.m. in Walter Reed Hospital. For a decade he had sat in his hospital suite and studied the developments of another conflict which made the trials of his A.E.F. pale by comparison. General Pershing will be buried with full military honors Monday at Arlington National Cemetery. That was his wish, expressed long before his death. Funeral services will be held at 3 p.m., the army announced. His body will lie in state in the rotunda of the National Capitol Sunday and Monday to allow the public to pay its last respects to the general … General Pershing was the fifth American in history to hold the five-star rank of ‘General of the Armies.’ He outranked such contemporary five-star generals as George C. Marshall, Dwight D. Eisenhower and Douglas MacArthur. Their title is ‘General of the Army.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “Washington, July 15 (U.P.) — The United States today curtly ordered Russia to stop publication of all propaganda in this country in a major new blow in the cold war. In a 300-word note to the Kremlin, it announced an immediate halt to publication of Amerika, the Russian-language magazine this country publishes in Russia. The State Department edict applies to the Soviet information bulletin, a slick-paper magazine giving Americans a rosy view of life in the Soviet Union. It cracks down on all Red propaganda flowing from Moscow. The action leaves the department’s ‘Voice of America’ as the only information link between the American and Russian people. The Kremlin has never been able to silence its broadcasts, despite widespread jamming efforts which have been stepped up in the past few months.”


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