Brooklyn Boro

June 8: ON THIS DAY in 1941, Roosevelt threatens to send U.S. troops unless CIO strikers return to plane plant

June 8, 2020 Brooklyn Eagle History

ON THIS DAY IN 1884, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Mr. W.F. Stanley, F.G.S., has made a microscopic examination of some of the dust that fell upon the deck of the barque Arabella at about 1,000 miles from Krakatoa before the 28th of August last — that is, two days after the period of the greatest eruption. Mr. Stanley analyzed principally the forms and dimensions of the particles to ascertain their floating and optical properties. He found the dust was formed mainly of pumice, but that this pumice was for the most part of an extremely light kind, or what he terms overblown — that is, that the ordinary air bubbles that are found in pumice were much distended and blown so thin that they appeared to have been burst into fragments. Under the microscope with high power and oblique illumination, these fragments resemble pieces of broken watch glasses.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1941, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (INS) — President Roosevelt today threatened to use Federal troops within 48 hours to break the C.I.O. strike in the North America Aviation plant at Inglewood, Cal., and served notice that similar drastic action to end defense work stoppages would be taken whenever needed during the unlimited national emergency. Immediately after the dramatic White House ultimatum was issued, the War Department disclosed it was ready to move troops into the strike-bound Inglewood plant, where work on $200,000,000 worth of badly needed bombing planes is tied up … In Los Angeles, leaders of the United Automobile Workers Union, C.I.O., met to consider the President’s ultimatum … Mr. Roosevelt also summoned Harvey W. Brown, a leader of the A.F.L. strike that has stopped work on naval vessels in San Francisco shipyards, to a White House conference Monday and declared through Secretary Stephen T. Early that he ‘does not countenance’ the strike of 20,000 workers in the Northwest lumber camps. The President also let it be known he was ready for a showdown with Southern coal operators, who have been given until Monday night to accept the National Mediation Board’s proposal to pay miners $7 a day — the same rate of pay Northern miners are now receiving.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1941, the Eagle reported, “Charging Boro President [John] Cashmore failed to notify them of tomorrow’s hearing on a proposal to move the General Grant statue to Manhattan, Brooklyn war veterans yesterday expressed their determination to attend the session and battle for retention of the monument in the borough. Col. William A. Dawkins, county commander of the United Spanish War Veterans, telegraphed the Borough President that 15 camps of Spanish War Veterans are ‘unalterably opposed to the removal of the General Grant statue from Brooklyn to Manhattan.’ He added: ‘ We cannot understand why we were not officially notified of this meeting, as Spanish War veterans, since we have been on record for two years against such action.’ A similar telegraph was sent by County Commander Joseph Aimee of Brooklyn Council, Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States, who said, ‘Our organization is on record since 1938 as being unalterably opposed to the removal of this statue to Manhattan. Our organization’s views will definitely be expressed with or without an invitation. The Grant statue is going to stay in Brooklyn.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “MINEOLA — County Executive A. Holly Patterson today disclosed the Nassau Police Department will hire 108 women for part-time duty at school crossings to relieve a like number of men in uniform for more urgent police work. Plans for introducing the feminine touch ‘have been under way for some time,’ Mr. Patterson said. The policewomen will work six hours a day on school days and receive $9 a tour. Applications will be received between June 21 and 26 from women who are between 21 and 40, 5 feet 2 in height and not too stout, and have at least a grammar school education. They will go to work with the beginning of the Fall term. Married women are preferred, the County Executive said, and married women with children are particularly preferred — ‘they’ll understand children.’”


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