Brooklyn Boro

September 20: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

September 20, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
Share this:

ON THIS DAY IN 1903, a Brooklyn Daily Eagle editorial said, “Paupers from Europe are being dumped in the United States by the Transatlantic steamship lines for the sake of the passage money in such appalling numbers that at last even the authorities at Washington have become alarmed. Figures of so startling a character have been presented recently to the Commissioner General of Immigration that he has ordered a complete statistical report from every county in the nation relating to this phase of the immigration question. The figures that have so frightened the authorities at Washington show that among the 401,057 aliens who landed at the port of New York during the six months ending June 30 of this year, 580 have become public charges, voluntarily applying for relief. Back of this superficial statement is an appalling array of facts — so appalling, indeed, that if similar results are shown in the same ratio throughout those parts of the country where the foreign element find homes, it may be that legislative steps may be taken to throw out barriers of precaution and protection. When it is remembered that more than 25 percent of the immigrants that come to America remain in New York State, and the greater part of these in New York City, one is able to grasp the enormity of the problem with which the nation is confronted … The most significant figures are contained in the report that out of the 66,400 paupers maintained in the city and town almshouses of New York during the fiscal year ending September 30, 1901, 28,976 were native born and 37,424 were foreign born. It cost New York State in 1901 $15,941,622 to support her paupers, and more than $5,000,000 to maintain the inmates of her insane asylums.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1942, the Eagle reported, “The direct charge that Thomas E. Dewey’s candidacy for governor on the Republican ticket is motivated solely by a desire to promote himself for the presidency in 1944 was aired for the first time in the current Democratic state campaign yesterday as activities in both camps increased. While Edwin F. Jaeckle of Buffalo, Republican state chairman, issued a call for a series of six regional conferences within a week’s time, Roy F. Bush of Rochester, Democratic leader of Monroe County, raised the 1944 issue against Mr. Dewey in a press conference at the Democratic state headquarters in the Hotel Biltmore … Mr. Dewey, whose bid for the Republican presidential nomination was defeated by Wendell L. Willkie in 1940, declared in his acceptance speech at last month’s Saratoga Springs convention he intended to ‘devote the next four years exclusively to the service of the people of New York State.”

DAILY TOP BROOKLYN NEWS
News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1949, the Eagle reported, “CANTON (U.P.) — Amoy, the big Nationalist port city in Fukien Province, may be evacuated at any time in the face of Communist pressure, private dispatches reaching here said today. The Nationalists were reported to have thrown air and naval reinforcements into the stepping-stone to Formosa [Taiwan], but the Communists continued to advance along the Changchow-Amoy highway.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1950, the Eagle reported, “Despite the fact that three of its stars are hospitalized with polio and that the entire squad of 45 has been placed on a two-week ‘rest period,’ the Erasmus Hall High School football team still hopes to have a season this year. The players, who have had contact recently with the trio of hospitalized stars, have been instructed to take plenty of rest and avoid exertion, and have been excused from their regular gymnasium classes. But Coach Joseph Monahan reported today that he expects to continue with football this year ‘if it is humanly possible.’”

***

George R. R. Martin
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP
Sophia Loren
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Oscar-winning actress Sophia Loren, who was born in 1934; “A Song of Ice and Fire” author George R. R. Martin, who was born in 1948; Styx co-founder Chuck Panozzo, who was born in 1948; “Office Space” star Gary Cole, who was born in 1956; Thompson Twins co-founder Alannah Currie, who was born in 1957; TV journalist Deborah Roberts, who was born in 1960; Extreme guitarist Nuno Bettencourt, who was born in 1966; “3rd Rock from the Sun” star Kristen Johnston, who was born in 1967; Soundgarden bassist Ben Shepherd, who was born in 1969; “Blade” star N’Bushe Wright, who was born in Brooklyn in 1969; former N.Y. Mets outfielder Jason Bay, who was born in 1978; former NFL return specialist Dante Hall, who was born in 1978; “American Idol” champion Phillip Phillips, who was born in 1990; and former N.Y. Islanders captain John Tavares, who was born in 1990.

Gary Cole
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP

***

RED-LETTER DAY: Red Auerbach was born in Brooklyn on this day in 1917. As coach of the Boston Celtics from 1950 to 1966, he won nine NBA titles, including eight straight from 1959 to 1966. After he retired from coaching, he was either general manager or president of the Celtics from 1966 to 1997. He was team president from 2001 until his death in 2006. In 1980 the Professional Basketball Writers Association named him the greatest coach in NBA history, and he is widely considered the best sports executive of all time.

***

SHARK WEAK: “Happy Days” jumped the shark on this day in 1977. Cool guy Arthur “The Fonz” Fonzarelli, in his trademark leather jacket, flew over a shark while water skiing in L.A. — a gimmick at odds with the sitcom’s normal action. “Jumping the shark” is now a term to describe an outlandish stunt that signals a creative decline.

***

Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Mistakes are a part of the dues one pays for a full life.”

— screen legend Sophia Loren, who was born on this day in 1934


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment