Brooklyn Boro

November 26: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

November 26, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1941, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — Railroad and railroad union officials indicated little hope today that the emergency board’s re-hearing of wage disputes involving 1,125,000 railroad workers would result in a compromise settlement. Although accepting President Roosevelt’s request yesterday that both management and labor appear for a second time before his special emergency board, spokesmen interpreted the move only as ‘an effort to keep both parties talking across a table.’ A nation-wide strike has been called for Dec. 7 if a settlement is not reached. Both John J. Pelley, president of the Association of American Railroads, and George M. Harrison, president of the Brotherhood of Railway Clerks, declined to express hope or expectation that reconsideration of the board’s original recommendations would resolve the dispute. Both emphasized that the move was made ‘solely on the President’s initiative.’ Mr. Roosevelt announced yesterday he had requested both parties to meet with the board next Friday and Saturday, because of additional facts brought out in direct management-labor negotiations. One day will be allotted both groups with the board reporting back to the President on Monday, Dec. 1.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1951, the Eagle reported, “ROME (U.P.) — Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower told the North Atlantic Treaty Council today that he was counting on the new ‘baby’ tactical atomic bombs for the defense of Europe against Communist aggression. Addressing the Military Committee of the council, Eisenhower said, however, that even the use of such bombs would not remove the need for 60 to 70 divisions of ground troops for his Atlantic Treaty defense forces. Delegates from participating countries who are here to discuss defense problems met in secret today, but a spokesman disclosed Eisenhower’s speech. The Supreme Commander of the Atlantic forces said his Atlantic Treaty Command was ‘taking into account what new weapons might do to facilitate the task of building up strength in Europe … to face aggression.’ ‘New weapons,’ it was made known, mean the new small atomic weapons recently tested in the United States in sight of troops. They can be used on the battlefield for limited destruction in contrast to the mass destruction of the larger A-bombs.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “TAIPEI, FORMOSA (U.P.) — Swarms of Red Chinese troops invaded tiny Wuchiu Island today but a spokesman for Chiang Kai-shek said Nationalist defenders forced the assault force to withdraw. The government spokesman said the Reds seized a beachhead on the rockbound island but retreated an hour later, leaving behind many captured troops. It was the first major Communist raid on a Nationalist-held island since the Reds carried out a hit-and-run raid on Quemoy Island, 75 miles southwest of Wuchiu, on Aug. 23. Invading Red Chinese hit the Wuchiu beachhead in an amphibious assault from 10 troop-carrying junks. Fierce hand-to-hand fighting followed as Nationalist troops met the invaders head-on. Nationalist warplanes bombed the fleet of junks and Chiang’s warships steamed toward the scene. Military observers considered it significant that the Communists had not attacked Tachen, far to the north, or Quemoy again. They noted that, instead, the Reds picked a tiny island which lies the shortest distance route from the China mainland to Chiang’s Formosan stronghold. Wuchiu, an S-shaped island on the 25th parallel only 150 miles from Taipei, was not viewed as of vital strategic importance to the defense of Formosa — unless the Communists were planning to use it for a leap-frog campaign, these observers said.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “CHICAGO (U.P.) — Color television will make the black and white family portrait ‘obsolete almost overnight,’ a prominent photographer predicts. Paul L. Gittings, former president of the Photographers’ Association of America, said ‘The viewing public will become so accustomed to color television so rapidly that the photographic industry will be hard pressed to keep pace with the consequent demand for color photos.’ Weddings and society functions in the future, Gittings said, ‘will be recorded exclusively in color. Direct color formal portraits of the bride and direct color or stereo-color candids of the ceremonies will be must items in the wedding budget.’”

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Rita Ora
Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP
Tina Turner
Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include former CIA Director Porter Goss, who was born in 1938; comedian and impersonator Rich Little, who was born in 1938; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Tina Turner, who was born in 1939; Rock and Roll Hall of Famer John McVie (Fleetwood Mac), who was born in 1945; Pro Football Hall of Famer Art Shell, who was born in 1946; Pro Football Hall of Famer Harry Carson, who was born in 1953; NASCAR Hall of Famer Dale Jarrett, who was born in 1956; “NYPD Blue” star Garcelle Beauvais, who was born in 1966; “Unwritten” singer Natasha Bedingfield, who was born in 1981; and singer and actress Rita Ora, who was born in 1990.

Harry Carson
Andy Kropa/Invision/AP

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BY GEORGE: President George Washington proclaimed this day as Thanksgiving Day in 1789. Both houses of Congress, by their joint committee, had requested him to recommend “a day of public thanksgiving and prayer, to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many and signal favors of Almighty God, especially by affording them an opportunity to peaceably establish a form of government for their safety and happiness.”

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IT’S THE GREAT CARTOONIST: Charles M. Schulz was born 100 years ago today. The Minnesota native created the “Peanuts” comic strip, which debuted on Oct. 2, 1950. The strip included Charlie Brown; his sister, Sally; his dog, Snoopy; friends Linus and Lucy and a variety of other characters. Schulz’s last daily strip was published Jan. 3, 2000, and his last Sunday strip was published Feb. 13, 2000, the day after his death. “Peanuts” ran in more than 2,500 newspapers worldwide and was spun off into animated TV specials such as “A Charlie Brown Christmas” (1965) and “It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown” (1966).

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Don’t worry about the world coming to an end today. It is already tomorrow in Australia.”

— cartoonist Charles M. Schulz, who was born on this day in 1922


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