Brooklyn Boro

September 27: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

September 27, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1870, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “From startling events on the earth attention has been recently diverted to wonderful phenomena in the heavens. But for the absorbing interest of things terrestrial, things celestial would have risen to the newspaper standard of the sensational. The indefatigable [C.H.F.] Peters of Utica, the most industrious explorer of the firmament and successful star-discoverer of his time, has added another to his long list of asteroids. He has done this so often, however, that a planet the more or less occasions little surprise. There was an auroral display the other night which those who were fortunate enough to see pronounce the most brilliant exhibition of the kind on record. It extended as far as the Pacific coast.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1903, an Eagle editorial said, “Greater New York will have a population of 6,191,250 in 1920, according to a sober prediction made by Elmer Lawrence Corthell of No. 1 Nassau street, an engineer of international reputation. According to the figures on which he bases his estimate, this means an increase in the population of the metropolis of 2,357,251 inhabitants. If one can imagine a monster city, as large as London with all its environs — a city capable of containing the combined populations of Paris, Berlin, St. Petersburg, Dublin, Butte, Mont., and Paterson, N.J.; or, to take another view, a city with a population within 100,000 as large as that of the state of Pennsylvania, or one as large as the combined populations of Alabama, Indiana, Wyoming, North Dakota and Hawaii — one may obtain an idea of the immensity expressed in these seven figures. If we add to this the possibilities of a series of wonderful transportation systems, uniting, almost within the hour, New York and Philadelphia with its increased population of 2,000,000 into practically one mighty municipality, by a chain of big New Jersey cities like Jersey City with 450,000, Newark with 400,000, Elizabeth with 150,000 and a score of smaller places, we may have a vision of the future more marvelous than the dreams of the most daring romancer.”

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News for those who live, work and play in Brooklyn and beyond

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ON THIS DAY IN 1929, the Eagle reported, “Members of the Central Brooklyn Mid-day Club last night heard A.C. Welch, traffic manager of the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, state that Brooklyn has 41 freight lines and 10 passenger lines docking against her waterfront, while Manhattan has 17 passenger and 10 freight lines. ‘Brooklyn should get more of the passenger lines to dock along her waterfront,’ he declared. ‘It is a known fact that Manhattan wants to lengthen her piers, but the War Department will not allow her to do so, the only alternative being therefore to dig into the island itself. This project would entail an expense of $1,000,000 for every 100 feet, making it very impractical. Therefore, there is only one other alternative to pursue — and that is to develop Brooklyn. This boro has the facilities to handle three times the amount of shipping business that she handles at the present time. She has transportation to Manhattan, to the theatrical and business centers, and, most important of all, to the large hotels and railroad terminals.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — The Joint Congressional Atomic Energy Committee is studying the question of sharing certain atomic information with key Allied commanders in Europe, it was disclosed today. An informed source said the subject is ‘very much under consideration’ and it is ‘possible, if not probable,’ it may be presented to Congress next year. He said the committee asked the Defense Department in July for information on use of atomic weapons in defending Europe, but has received no reply. This information, he said, would aid in evaluating recent ‘suggestions’ of General Omar N. Bradley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Bradley said on his return from Europe this week the question of sharing some information on use of atomic weapons in European defense should be discussed.”

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Avril Lavigne
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Gwyneth Paltrow
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Oscar-winning actor Claude Jarman Jr., who was born in 1934; World Golf Hall of Famer Kathy Whitworth, who was born in 1939; The Guess Who co-founder Randy Bachman, who was born in 1943; “Star Wars” actor Denis Lawson, who was born in 1947; “The Lone Gunmen” star Tom Braidwood, who was born in 1948; Baseball Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt, who was born in 1949; former Marvel Comics editor-in-chief Jim Shooter, who was born in 1951; Golden State Warriors head coach Steve Kerr, who was born in 1965; Space Shuttle astronaut Stephanie Wilson, who was born in 1966; Oscar-winning actress Gwyneth Paltrow, who was born in 1972; rapper Lil Wayne, who was born in 1982; “Complicated” singer Avril Lavigne, who was born in 1984; tennis player and Olympic gold medalist Monica Puig, who was born in 1993; and “The Fallout” star Jenna Ortega, who was born in 2002.

Lil Wayne
Owen Sweeney/Invision/AP

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FOUNDER’S DAY: Samuel Adams was born 300 years ago today. The Boston native was a leader of the movement that became the American Revolution. Along with his second cousin, future U.S. President John Adams, he signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776. He died in 1803.

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GETTING IN TOON: Thomas Nast was born on this day in 1840. The “Father of the American Cartoon” is best known for his scathing criticism of “Boss” William Tweed and the Tammany Hall Democratic political machine in New York. He also created the modern version of Santa Claus. He died in 1902.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“No people will tamely surrender their liberties, nor can any be easily subdued, when knowledge is diffused and virtue is preserved.”

— U.S. founding father Samuel Adams, who was born on this day in 1722


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