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June 15: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

June 15, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1906, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “Charles [Evans] Hughes will sail for Europe within ten days for his summer vacation. He will return to New York some time between August 15 and September 1. Mr. Hughes will necessarily take no part in the early campaign of the Republican party to find a candidate for governor. It is reported that B.B. Odell, Jr., who had been urging the availability of Mr. Hughes for the Republican nomination for governor, has abandoned the idea, and that the name of Mr. Hughes is no longer being considered. One of the leading politicians of the Republican party in Brooklyn, when asked today if the report that Hughes was out of the race for the gubernatorial nomination, said: ‘That is nonsense. To my way of thinking there is no one man in either party who has so good a chance for nomination as Charles E. Hughes. A brief consideration of the situation will convince you that I am right. [William Randolph] Hearst is, of course, the dominant feature of the political muddle as it exists today. The Democrats are in a way under Hearst’s thumb. Before the wiser leaders take any action, they will wait to see what Hearst will do. If they have to do so they will swallow Hearst, hook, line and sinker, and will try to recover their party health by post-election negotiations. They know that two-thirds of the Democratic voters want a radical and they know that Hearst has got himself into a position where he stands for radicalism.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1943, the Eagle reported, “‘I suggest that the OPA take all its books, volumes, records, reams and the hundreds of rules and regulations and use them as fuel in the coal shortage,’ Mayor LaGuardia today told delegates gathered in the Hotel New Yorker for the two-day convention of the Dairymen’s League Co-operative Association. He urged that a new set of rules, ‘concise, simple and sensible,’ be written so as not to exceed one page in length and in such a way that retailers can understand and apply them. The entire program of food production, handling, transportation, wholesaling, retailing and price fixing in three places should be handled by ‘one streamlined agency’’ that would carry on the combined tasks of the Food Administration, OPA, ODT and other agencies, so that the right hand would know what the left hand is doing, the mayor said. ‘And above all,’ said the mayor, ‘keep the politicians out of the food picture. Where do they come in to be wedges between the producer and the consumer?’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1945, the Eagle reported, “Anti-Inflation Week will be observed tonight at a rally sponsored by the Consumers Council of the Queensbridge Tenants League and the Queensbridge Community Association. The rally will be held in Queensbridge Community Center, 10-25 41st Ave.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle reported, “Brooklyn’s first postwar celebration of Flag Day in five years was observed yesterday at indoor and outdoor exercises throughout a borough grateful for peace. Thanks for victory was the principal theme of addresses at commemorative events sponsored by veterans organizations and civic and fraternal groups. Celebrations also were held in schools. The day marked the 169th anniversary of the adoption of the Stars and Stripes as the national emblem by the Continental Congress on June 14, 1777 … At City Hall, Mayor [William] O’Dwyer addressed a Flag Day audience of 100 schoolchildren in the City Council chambers. He urged his listeners to ‘be true to the principles of those from whom we inherited this sacred emblem.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “Decision was reserved in Brooklyn Supreme Court today on a Republican move to upset the recent apportionment of Brooklyn Assembly districts. Justice George A. Arkwright heard argument yesterday on an order for City Council President Abe Stark and other Democratic leaders to show cause why the apportionment should not be adjudged ‘unconstitutional and void.’ Four Brooklynites, including former Surrogate Roy M.D. Richardson, instituted the court challenge for the Kings County Republican organization, charging that the 3rd, 4th, 5th and 17th Assembly districts, as apportioned by the City Council, are not ‘contiguous and compact’ as required by the state Constitution.”

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Courteney Cox
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP
Leah Remini
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Baseball Hall of Famer Billy Williams, who was born in 1938; political activist and businessman Ward Connerly, who was born in 1939; Super Bowl-winning coach Mike Holmgren, who was born in 1948; Houston Astros manager Dusty Baker, who was born in 1949; “Dance Fever” host Deney Terrio, who was born in 1950; Kansas lead singer Steve Walsh, who was born in 1951; “According to Jim” star Jim Belushi, who was born in 1954; Baseball Hall of Famer and former N.Y. Yankees third baseman Wade Boggs, who was born in 1958; “The Young and the Restless” star Eileen Davidson, who was born in 1959; Oscar-winning actress Helen Hunt, who was born in 1963; “Friends” star Courteney Cox, who was born in 1964; “The King of Queens” star Leah Remini, who was born in 1970; former N.Y. Yankees pitcher and 2001 ALCS MVP Andy Pettitte, who was born in 1972; “How I Met Your Mother” star Neil Patrick Harris, who was born in 1973; and Olympic gold medal-winning gymnast Madison Kocian, who was born in 1997.

Andy Pettitte
Kathy Willens/AP

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LAW OF THE LAND: On this day in 1215, King John of England sealed the Magna Carta “in the meadow called Ronimed between Windsor and Staines.” Continually reinterpreted, the Magna Carta influenced the rise of England’s constitutional monarchy and lent historical weight to 18th-century ideas about inalienable natural law. It is still invoked popularly and in jurisprudence as a symbol of the written law’s power to subdue tyranny. Four original copies of the 1215 charter survive.

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COLLEGE CREDIT: The 12th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified on this day in 1804. It changed the method of electing the president and vice president after a tie in the electoral college during the election of 1800. Rather than each elector voting for two candidates, with the candidate receiving the most votes elected president and the second-place candidate elected vice president, each elector was now required to designate their choice for president and vice president, respectively.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“You campaign in poetry. You govern in prose.”

— former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo, who was born on this day in 1932


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