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February 10: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

February 10, 2023 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1924, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON, FEB. 9 — Present plans call for the House to consider the Johnson immigration bill as soon as it disposes of tax legislation. Chairman Johnson of the Immigration Committee today filed a report on the measure signed by 14 committee members. Dissenting views will be presented by three other members. Pointing out that the present 3 percent law, based on the 1910 census, expires June 30 next, the report declared there was ‘immediate and urgent need for enactment of immigration legislation.’ ‘The committee is advised,’ the report continued, ‘that the number of aliens desiring to enter the United States is very large. It is reasonable to assume that, despite unfavorable exchange rates, high steamship tariffs and other untoward factors, an immigration of between 1,500,000 and 2,000,000 would have entered the United States during each of the past two years if the 3 percent law had not barred the way. If the 3 percent law is permitted to expire and if no other legislation is enacted, the movement to our shores of the largest migration of peoples in the history of the world may be expected to begin July 1, 1924. The exclusion clauses of the act of Feb. 5, 1917 will be powerless to stay the tide.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1924, the Eagle reported, “There is no such person as a kleptomaniac. Those who pilfer from the counters of the big department stores are just common thieves, and hard-headed business men are setting out to prove these assertions. The National Retail Dry Goods Association, which has just concluded its five-day convention at the Hotel Astor, decided to conduct a more vigorous campaign against the shoplifters who rob the stores of hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of goods annually. A national organization to fight shoplifting was organized and a concerted plan was adopted not only to wipe out shoplifting but also to clean up all store thefts, including precautions by store employees and others. W.H. Jenkins, manager of the Stores Mutual Protective Association of St. Louis, appeared before the secretaries to outline the new assault on store thieves. Lew Hahn, managing director of the National Retail Dry Goods Association, is taking an active interest in Mr. Jenkins’ scheme, and woe be to the thief who tries to acquire anything when the clerk isn’t looking hereafter. Mr. Jenkins said all of the 23 protective associations in the country will be asked to join the national organization. It is proposed to establish headquarters where complete information concerning professional shoplifters and swindlers will be kept on file and from which notice of their movements will be sent to the members.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1947, the Eagle reported, “The city’s first public hearing on its most controversial subject — the nickel fare — opened in a jammed City Hall today before Mayor [William] O’Dwyer and the Board of Estimate. The Mayor and Controller Lazarus Joseph repeatedly interrupted two of the first three speakers, both of whom argued for a fare increase, but permitted Walter Gelhorn, special counsel of the A.F.L. Central Trades and Labor Council, to proceed without a halt in his plea for retention of the 5-cent fare. The first hour of the hearing brought a warning from Paul Windels, former Corporation Counsel, chairman of the Citizens Transit Committee, and one of the most outspoken proponents of a fare raise, that unless an increase is granted and real estate is relieved of the burden of meeting mounting subway deficits there will be ‘an irresistible pressure for a 15 percent increase in rents.’”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1956, the Brooklyn Record reported, “The combined forces of the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce and the Brooklyn Civic Council went into high gear today to insure a new home for the Brooklyn Dodgers. The Chamber’s President S.T. Williams centered his guns on Albany Hill, bombarding Brooklyn’s 31 legislators with a stirring letter appeal that they approve the Authority which would be created to enable the erection of a Brooklyn Sports Stadium. Arno J. Biederman, President of the Council, also took to the letter writing attack but centered his salvos on the local front. He asked all delegates and members of the Council to ‘take whatever action is possible to support the proposal.’ The issue was joined early this week when Borough President John Cashmore and Mayor Robert F. Wagner jointly announced tentative plans for the creation of a ‘Sports Center’ in the general vicinity of the Brooklyn terminal of the Long Island Rail Road.”

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Roberta Flack
Matt Licari/Invision/AP
Chloe Grace Moretz
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include soprano Leontyne Price, who was born in 1927; “Hart to Hart” star Robert Wagner, who was born in 1930; “Tonight, I Celebrate My Love” singer Roberta Flack, who was born in 1937; swimmer and Olympic gold medalist Mark Spitz, who was born in 1950; “Mad Money” host Jim Cramer, who was born in 1955; “This Week” host George Stephanopoulos, who was born in 1961; political commentator Glenn Beck, who was born in 1964; Oscar-winning actress Laura Dern, who was born in 1967; “Pitch Perfect” star Elizabeth Banks, who was born in 1974; Pro Football Hall of Famer Ty Law, who was born in 1974; “We’re the Millers” star Emma Roberts, who was born in 1991; “Dark Shadows” star Chloe Grace Moretz, who was born in 1997; and “Black-ish” star Yara Shahidi, who was born in 2000.

Laura Dern
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP

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SHERMAN’S MARCH: Allie Sherman was born in Brooklyn 100 years ago today. He began his football career at Brooklyn College and played in the NFL as a quarterback and defensive back from 1943 to 1947. He was the head coach of the N.Y. Giants from 1961 to 1969 and reached three straight championship games (1961-63). He died in 2015.

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SELLING THE DRAMA: Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman” debuted at Broadway’s Morosco Theater on this day in 1949. Directed by Elia Kazan, the play won six Tony Awards and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. It starred Lee J. Cobb, Arthur Kennedy and Cameron Mitchell.

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MAN VS. MACHINE: A computer won a chess tournament game for the first time on this day in 1996. IBM’s Deep Blue beat world champion Garry Kasparov in 34 moves, but Kasparov won the tournament, defeating the computer three times. Deep Blue could evaluate 200 million chess positions but was incapable of using artificial intelligence to learn.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Always walk in the light. And if you feel like you’re not walking in it, go find it.”

— singer Roberta Flack, who was born on this day in 1937


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