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October 4: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

October 4, 2022 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1937, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “LONDON (U.P.) — The government has avoided an open break with the Duke of Windsor by giving him permission to visit the United States with his Baltimore-born bride, it was understood today. Permission for the visit was given most reluctantly, it was said in quarters close to Buckingham Palace, to end the constant rumors — which here were interpreted almost as threats — that the Duke might return to Britain. Publication in today’s newspapers that the Duke intended to go to the United States at once brought public comment that he and his Duchess might settle down there eventually. There seemed some reason for belief that any such decision might win governmental approval — if for no other reason that the United States is 3,000 miles from Britain. It had been known that relations between the Duke and the government were approaching the crisis stage because of the close restriction imposed on the Duke’s movements … Public comment on the prospective American visit showed what the government and the royal family face, perhaps for years, as the result of the Duke’s abdication, and show how deeply the constitutional crisis that accompanied the abdication was felt.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1942, the Eagle reported, “Attorney General [John J.] Bennett, impressed by reports from Democratic leaders, as well as independent sources, that he is cutting into Republican strongholds, last night prepared for his first upstate campaign tour since his nomination for governor on the Democratic ticket. His campaign trek through upstate Republican-controlled territory begins when he leaves Grand Central Terminal shortly after midnight tonight on the first leg of a tour which opens tomorrow morning at Utica. He will spend four days campaigning through New York’s central tier and far north counties. Mr. Bennett spent yesterday in conference with committee chairmen and others at his headquarters in the Hotel Biltmore, while Thomas E. Dewey, his Republican opponent, relaxing from last week’s upstate tour, attended the World Series game in the Yankee Stadium.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1946, the Eagle reported, “The century-old Penny Bridge at the foot of Montague St., picturesque as it was, could no longer stand in the way of progress. The small metal footbridge which spanned the street where it cuts deeply from Brooklyn Heights to the East River, mecca of youngsters and nursemaids of the area by day and haven of spooners at night, has been torn down in the interests of the Brooklyn-Queens Connecting Highway. Engineers at Borough Hall today said that the present ramp will be filled in to bring everything to the upper level … Once before, in 1934, the span was in danger — but that time it was saved by the protests of aroused Brooklynites … One of the small bridge’s attractions was the splendid view of the Manhattan skyline it afforded. According to borough engineers, this view will be vastly improved by the improved park at the foot of the street now planned.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “PARIS (U.P.) — Dmitri Manuilsky of the Ukraine denounced President Truman for his atomic energy policy today, and American delegate Warren Austin countered with a demand that the Russians ‘stop throwing mud.’ An exchange occurred as the United Nations Political Committee resumed debate on atomic control. Austin in effect rejected the Soviet proposal of Saturday on atomic control. He asked the Russians whether they really wanted ‘effective international control of atomic energy’ or were clinging to the ‘idea that nationalism is supreme.’ Austin made the first of the Western replies to the Soviet proposal put forth by Andrei Vishinsky Saturday. Vishinsky had retreated from the Soviet position that all U.S. atom bombs must be destroyed at once, proposing a prohibition on such weapons simultaneously with the implementation of an international agreement. Manuilsky claimed that Mr. Truman’s main objective was to preserve a monopoly on atomic energy for use by the United States in a new war. He accused the United States of ‘ultra-imperialism’ and scoffed at what he called America’s ‘magnanimous offer’ on atomic energy. Austin reported that the United States would ‘go a long way to obtain unanimity’ on atomic questions, but only if Russia ceased its holdout against the minimum requirements laid down in the majority plan.”

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Jon Secada
Greg Allen/Invision/AP
Melissa Benoist
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include former N.Y. Rangers left wing Vic Hadfield, who was born in 1940; Baseball Hall of Famer Tony La Russa, who was born in 1944; “Amen” star Clifton Davis, who was born in 1945; Oscar-winning actress Susan Sarandon, who was born in 1946; Triumph drummer and singer Gil Moore, who was born in 1953; “Coach” star Bill Fagerbakke, who was born in 1957; “Just Another Day” singer Jon Secada, who was born in 1961; “The Omen” star Liev Schreiber, who was born in 1967; former N.Y. Knicks forward Kurt Thomas, who was born in 1972; “Clueless” star Alicia Silverstone, who was born in 1976; “She’s All That” star Rachel Leigh Cook, who was born in 1979; “Supergirl” star Melissa Benoist, who was born in 1988; and “Fifty Shades of Grey” star Dakota Johnson, who was born in 1989.


Tony La Russa
Ron Schwane/AP

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“B” IS FOR BICENTENNIAL: Rutherford B. Hayes was born 200 years ago today. The 19th U.S. president was a Union general during the Civil War, served in the House of Representatives from 1865 to 1867 and was twice elected governor of Ohio. The Republican served one term as president from 1877 to 1881. He died in 1893.

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NUCLEAR FAMILY: “Leave it to Beaver” premiered on this day in 1957. The sitcom about a stereotypical American family starred Jerry Mathers as Theodore “Beaver” Cleaver, Tony Dow as his brother Wally, and Hugh Beaumont and Barbara Billingsley as their parents Ward and June. The series ended on Sept. 12, 1963 but its popularity in syndication led to the 1980s sequel “Still the Beaver.”

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“The president of the United States should strive to be always mindful of the fact that he serves his party best who serves his country best.”

— former President Rutherford B. Hayes, who was born on this day in 1822


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