Brooklyn Boro

May 25: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

May 25, 2024 Dozier Hasty
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ON THIS DAY IN 1870, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The Fourteenth Regiment, two temperance societies, the Kings County Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Association and the Sixteenth Ward Veteran Association are to parade on Decoration Day. At Cypress Hills, a chorus, under the direction of Mr. C.W. Cheshire, will sing. It is to meet at Bunce’s music store, No. 27 Court street, May 26, at 7 o’clock. The ladies are taking a great interest in the affair, and laboring hard for its success. The programme will include demonstrations at the Naval Hospital, Greenwood, Cypress Hills, Holy Cross and Calvary Cemeteries, and at Fort Hamilton.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1911, the Eagle reported, “It is not unusual before a big race for parents, wives and relatives of the nominated drivers to beg them to give up the idea of driving. During the past few days the Indianapolis Motor Speedway management has received numerous telegrams and letters from the mother of young Walter Jones, begging the Speedway officials to disqualify him and prevent her boy from participating in the contest at the wheel of one of the Amplex racers. The Amplex factory also has been beseeched by Mrs. Jones to take the mount away from him. Aside from the fact that Jones insists that he will drive regardless of parental objection, the Speedway management is placed in a peculiar position. Jones’ entry fee has been paid and practically the only way he could be prevented from driving would be for incompetence or bad driving.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1912, the Eagle reported, “The left field fence at Fenway Park is rather short, and will undoubtedly be the target for all the sluggers this season.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1919, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON — The coming week will see the organization of the National Parks Association. Its sponsor is the National Parks Education Committee, which is under the leadership of Dr. Charles D. Walcott, head of the Smithsonian Institution; William Kent of California, Henry B.F. Macfarland of Washington and Robert Sterling Yard of the National Park Service. This committee has been studying for the past year a practical way to realize certain public uses of the national parks which are impossible of attainment under the government. The new association is the result of the recent public recognition of the supreme magnificence of American national parks and their importance to the nation. Four years ago these parks, with the exception of two, were unknown to the general public. Today the significance of most of the 18 parks is familiar to a large part of the people. Last year, notwithstanding war costs and conditions, more than 500,000 persons visited the parks, and this year is expected to make a new record. The National Parks Association will be non-partisan, independent and entirely separate from the government, but will work in full harmony with the National Park Service of the Department of the Interior. Robert Sterling Yard, chief of the educational section of the National Park Service, will resign from the government to take charge of its activities.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1944, the Eagle reported, “ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, NAPLES (U.P.) — Fifth Army columns from the Anzio beachhead and the main front to the southeast joined forces early today, a special communique announced, setting a trap for 17 outflanked enemy divisions and paving the way for an assault on Rome. Military observers in London said the junction foreshadowed the early fall of Rome, though they acknowledged that the Allied march on the capital may be delayed until an attempt can be made to annihilate the enemy divisions to the southeast. The junction was effected by patrols from two forces a few miles southeast of the bridgehead on the Anzio-Terracina coastal highway, the communique said. ‘This brings to a climax a spectacular advance of the 5th Army of more than 60 miles in only 14 days,’ the communique added. Only a few hours earlier, the official German DNB News Agency acknowledged that the Axis forces had withdrawn last night from the entire coastal sector between the two forces to a ‘shorter line’ in the mountains northeast of the Appian Way.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1951, the Eagle reported, “The New York Giants today brought up a 20-year-old Negro outfielder with less than a year of experience in organized baseball and asked him to win the National League pennant for them — beginning tonight. The Giants said there was a good chance the youngster would do it. They didn’t say he is their only hope but they know it. The youth is Willie Mays, a .353 hitter at Trenton in 1950 and a .477 slugger in 35 games at Minneapolis this year. It is only 339 days since he was graduated from Fairfield High School in Alabama and he has played just 116 games in organized baseball. But he will be in center field for the Giants when they meet the defending National League champion Phillies in Philadelphia tonight. The Giants’ front office thumps the tub with the advice that ‘he could make New York fans forget Mickey Mantle.’ But his real mission is to make New York fans forget the Giants’ 11-game losing streak.”

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Octavia Spencer
Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP
Cillian Murphy
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include Oscar-winning producer and former Coney Islander Irwin Winkler, who was born in 1931; “X-Men” star Ian McKellen, who was born in 1939; “Roots” star Leslie Uggams, who was born in 1943; puppeteer and filmmaker Frank Oz, who was born in 1944; “Room 222” star Karen Valentine, who was born in 1947; Scorpions singer Klaus Meine, who was born in 1948; “The Vagina Monologues” playwright Eve Ensler, who was born in 1953; U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, who was born in 1960; former N.J. Nets guard Kendall Gill, who was born in 1968; Oscar-winning actress Octavia Spencer, who was born in 1970; “28 Days Later” star Cillian Murphy, who was born in 1976; Pro Football Hall of Famer Brian Urlacher, who was born in 1978; and Olympic gold medal-winning gymnast Aly Raisman, who was born in 1994.

Ian McKellen
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“It is not the length of life, but the depth.”

— writer and philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson, who was born on this day in 1803


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