Brooklyn Boro

July 9: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

July 9, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1935, Brooklyn Daily Eagle sportswriter Tommy Holmes said, “CINCINNATI — The bloodless ‘dream battle’ of Lake Erie in which a selected All-Star National League club fell before the picked stars of the American League for the third year in succession did not prove anything specific but it hinted at a number of things. Namely: 1 — The All-Star game cannot be regarded as a true test of comparative strength until the selected teams have the time and the opportunity to really ‘point’ for the contest. That, of course, may be never. 2 — And until the National League ceases to regard the annual ‘dream battle’ as something of a picnic while the American League operates with malice aforethought, the American League will continue to win. I do not mean that the American League hasn’t had the stronger team in the field. Probably it has had. While the American League is out there playing to win, the National League is out there playing an exhibition with the object of getting as many names in the box score as possible. This was noticeable last year when the Nationals made so many shifts that Billy Herman broke into the game twice, once as a pinch hitter and later as a second baseman.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1935, the Eagle reported, “Intricate machinery which will create an artificial heaven in the new Hayden Planetarium of the American Museum of Natural History was in the course of erection today. The apparatus, which weighs more than two tons, arrived from Germany several days ago in 21 crates and workmen yesterday began carefully to unpack it under the supervision of Paul Lange, German engineer.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1936, the Eagle reported, “CHICAGO (A.P.) — Scattered rains brought temporary relief today to a few sections in the nation blanketed by stifling heat, but no general break was forecast in the torrid weather. Deaths reached at least 168, and blazing destruction continued to mow crops in the fertile fields of the Middle West. Misery, want and despair grew in the agricultural regions. Spreading East, the heat wave involved about half of the nation, and temperatures in three figures were in prospect for most states from midcontinent to the Eastern seaboard … Reports from New York State indicated new heat records would be set, while Connecticut, New Jersey and Michigan foresaw continued high marks.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1944, Eagle columnist Ernest Lindley said, “The numerous and diverse Democratic leaders who think that the renomination of Henry Wallace would be a political mistake believe that they have made headway during the Vice President’s absence in Siberia and China. They have submitted the President and his White House assistants to a steady bombardment. At this writing, no final word has come from Mr. Roosevelt. He has left no doubt about his own decided personal preference for Wallace’s renomination. But he has not said that he will not run with anyone except Wallace. If the opposition to Wallace were confined to the right-wing Democrats from the South, the President’s decision would be easier. But it is not. It includes many of the practical Democratic politicians in the North whose personal loyalty to the President is beyond question. And it includes sundry liberal Democrats in and around the Administration who have other candidates or who, for one reason or another, have become convinced that Wallace would lose more votes for Roosevelt than he would gain in November.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “CHICAGO (U.P.) — The Republican Convention Credentials Committee today handed Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower 13 disputed Louisiana delegates in a surprise ‘harmony move’ sparked by supporters of Senator Robert A. Taft. Taft men said their generosity was designed solely to soften factional bitterness damaging to G.O.P. chances in the November Presidential election. Whether there was more to it than that remains to be seen, but Eisenhower supporters on the Credentials Committee quickly accepted the Taft order. The vote to seat the 13 Ike delegates was 50 to 0. The Taft switch came as the Credentials Committee resumed hearings in the Congress Hotel on the fight over ‘stolen’ Southern delegates, the outcome of which might be decisive in throwing the party’s Presidential nomination to Taft or Eisenhower. The committee’s decision will have to be ratified on the convention floor, where other engagements in the ‘war of the stolen delegates’ will be fought to a showdown, possibly tonight.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “SPRING LAKE, N.J. (U.P.) — Top-seeded Vic Seixas, back home from the English championships at Wimbledon, was matched against William Clothier II, a fellow Philadelphian, today in the second round of the Spring Lake invitation tennis tournament. Seixas drew a bye in yesterday’s opening round, which also saw seeded players Billy Talbert and Sidney Schwartz of Brooklyn post easy victories.” (Editor’s note: Vic Seixas won 15 Major championships in his career and was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1971. He died July 5, 2024 at age 100.)

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Jimmy Smits
Christopher Smith/Invision/AP
Tom Hanks
Matt Licari/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “Strangers” author Dean Koontz, who was born in 1945; “October Sky” star Chris Cooper, who was born in 1951; musician and TV personality John Tesh, who was born in 1952; U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, who was born in 1955; “NYPD Blue” star Jimmy Smits, who was born in Brooklyn in 1955; Oscar-winning actor Tom Hanks, who was born in 1956; Hole singer Courtney Love, who was born in 1964; Anthrax bassist Frank Bello, who was born in 1965; The White Stripes singer Jack White, who was born in 1975; long-distance runner and Olympian Kara Goucher, who was born in 1978; and Cheetah Girl Kiely Williams, who was born in 1986.

Kara Goucher
Frank Augstein/AP

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MAKING AMENDS: The 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified on this day in 1868. It provides that no state shall have the right to abridge the rights of any citizen without due process and equal protection under the law. It was proposed in response to issues related to former slaves after the Civil War.

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HIGH-WATER MARK: The highest tsunami in history was recorded on this day in 1958. An earthquake registering 8.3 on the Richter scale caused a massive landslide at the head of Lituya Bay, Alaska, which in turn created a tsunami of 1,700 feet. A 300-foot wave immediately followed, scouring bare about four to five square miles of land on both sides of the bay. Amazingly, only five people were killed.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“If you do the same thing too often, it gets to be the only thing you can do.”

— actor Richard Roundtree, who was born on this day in 1942


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