Brooklyn Boro

July 8: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

July 8, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
Share this:

ON THIS DAY IN 1848, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle said, “Mr. Winthrop’s oration on laying the cornerstone of the Washington monument was capital. We have seen nothing to equal it since the great oration of George Bancroft over the remains of the immortal Jackson. One of the most striking passages occurs while the speaker is alluding directly to the monument. Bursting out into an impassioned mood, he exclaims: ‘Build it to the skies; you cannot outreach the loftiness of his principles! Found it upon the massive and eternal rock; you cannot make it more enduring than his fame! Construct it of the peerless Parisian marble; you cannot make it purer than his life! Exhaust upon it the rules and principles of ancient and modern art; you cannot make it more proportionate than his character.’”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1880, the Eagle reported, “The celebration by the Franco-American Union in Paris yesterday of the assurance that within three years Bartholdi’s colossal statue of Liberty, which the French people have presented to the United States, and which is to be erected on Bedloe’s Island, will be completed is significant of the cordial relations existing between the two countries.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1912, the Eagle reported, “The Bull Moose headquarters, from which the Roosevelt Progressive campaign will be conducted in Brooklyn, were opened today at 200 Montague street. Timothy L. Woodruff is to take charge this afternoon. Mr. Woodruff will be in the offices several hours a day for some time to come. He will meet all of the Brooklyn men who want to join with the Roosevelt faction, and will assign them work for the new party. While the Roosevelt headquarters were being opened, the regular G.O.P. leaders were endeavoring to counteract the effect by telling of Federal patronage soon to be available for the faithful Taft men in Kings County. It was said that there would soon be a big job ready for someone in Brooklyn who had not deserted the President.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1948, the Eagle reported, “CAIRO (U.P.) — Arab leaders have rejected flatly proposals to extend the United Nations truce in Palestine and reports from Tel Aviv said Egyptian forces already were attacking Jewish positions south of the Israel capital. The hour at which Count Folke Bernadotte, U.N. mediator, had planned to make public Arab and Jewish replies to his suggestions for extending the truce passed without an official release from his Rhodes headquarters. But Pablo Azcarate, representing Count Bernadotte here, said ‘the Arabs turned down Bernadotte’s truce extension proposal on grounds that the four-week truce has been unsatisfactory.’ At Lake Success, the United Nations Security Council planned an emergency session — probably tomorrow. U.N. Secretary General Trygve Lie received a cable from Moshe Shertok, Foreign Minister of Israel, saying that Israel had agreed to prolong the truce for 30 days. At Haifa, U.N. representatives announced that their task in Palestine has ended with Arab rejection of proposals to extend the truce, and their group of truce observers will be withdrawn immediately.”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — Democratic National Chairman Frank E. McKinney today pledged that the party ‘will not inject racial prejudice or religious bigotry’ into the Presidential campaign. McKinney made the statement in a letter to six Protestant, Roman Catholic and Jewish leaders who had urged him to call on ‘all candidates to take all necessary means to prevent any expression of racial bias … and to condemn publicly and emphatically every occurrence thereof.’ ‘The Democratic party will not condone any such activity in behalf of its candidates,’ McKinney said. ‘It will vigorously condemn and disavow any such activity should it develop.’ McKinney praised the religious leaders’ plan to set up non-partisan, non-sectarian committees to combat such prejudice in the campaign and said he was ‘sure that the Democratic National Committee will join completely in cooperation and support.’ Meanwhile, Vice President Alben W. Barkley pooh-poohed any idea that his age is a handicap in his campaign for the Democratic Presidential nomination. The 74-year-old veep told newsmen, ‘I hope none of you forgets to mention my age.’ It was Barkley’s first news conference since he announced Sunday night that he is an ‘active’ candidate for the Presidency. ‘I would not reduce my age by one hour to become President of the United States,’ he said. ‘If there is anyone in this country who can outstrip me in fighting for the Democratic party and good government, let him step up and complain of my age and let others keep silent.’”

***

ON THIS DAY IN 1954, the Eagle reported, “WASHINGTON (U.P.) — Four Puerto Rican terrorists who fired a vicious volley of bullets on House of Representatives members March 1 today were given the maximum prison sentences. Lolita Lebron, 34, who waved a Puerto Rican flag while she fired from the House gallery, received a prison sentence of from 16 years and eight months to 50 years. Prison terms of from 25 to 75 years were imposed on each of her three co-assailants, Rafael Cancel Miranda, 25, who claimed to be ringleader; Andres Figueroa Cordero, 29, and Irving Flores Rodriguez, 28. The four, all members of the revolutionary Puerto Rican Nationalist party were convicted June 16 of assault with a deadly weapon. The three men were also found guilty of five additional counts each of assault with intent to kill, but Mrs. Lebron was found innocent on this charge. In imposing the sentences, Federal Judge Alexander Holtzoff said the four fanatics stood convicted of ‘a crime so heinous, so infamous, so daring and atrocious as to have shocked the conscience of the nation.’ He said they have displayed no regret and no remorse and have ‘shown no contrition.’ Therefore, he added, the ends of justice would be met only by meting out maximum penalties provided by law.”

***

Milo Ventimiglia
Richard Shotwell/Invision/AP
Sophia Bush
Evan Agostini/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “Arrested Development” star Jeffrey Tambor, who was born in 1944; “True Grit” star Kim Darby, who was born in 1947; celebrity chef Wolfgang Puck, who was born in 1949; Oscar-winning actress Anjelica Huston, who was born in 1951; Pro Football Hall of Famer Jack Lambert, who was born in 1952; author and activist Marianne Williamson, who was born in 1952; “Footloose” star Kevin Bacon, who was born in 1958; “One of Us” singer Joan Osborne, who was born in 1962; “Loser” singer Beck, who was born in 1970; “Heroes” star Milo Ventimiglia, who was born in 1977; “One Tree Hill” star Sophia Bush, who was born in 1982; “Stranger Things” star Maya Hawke, who was born in 1998; and rapper and actor Jaden Smith, who was born in 1998.

Beck
Katy Winn/Invision/AP

***

POST TIME: On this day in 1911, Nan Jane Aspinwall rode into New York City carrying a letter to Mayor William Jay Gaynor from San Francisco Mayor Patrick Henry McCarthy, becoming the first woman to cross the U.S. on horseback. She began her trip on Sept. 1, 1910 and covered 4,500 miles in 301 days.

***

TIME FLIES: On this day in 2011, Space Shuttle Atlantis took off from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, for the 135th and last mission of the space shuttle program. Atlantis was carrying supplies for the International Space Station and its 12-day mission included an investigation into robotically refueling spacecraft. The first space shuttle, Columbia, was launched on April 12, 1981. Robert L. Crippen, commander of that flight, was present at the final launch.

***

Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“The pen is mightier than the sword, and considerably easier to write with.”

— comedian Marty Feldman, who was born on this day in 1934


Leave a Comment


Leave a Comment