Brooklyn Boro

July 6: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

July 6, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1863, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported, “The gallant army of the Potomac has saved the nation’s capital, has driven the foe from Pennsylvania, has saved the North from the actual presence of war, and rescued the people from the humiliation which a week ago seemed inevitable. All honor to the army and to its gallant leader. The salient points of the battle of Gettysburg are readily understood. General Lee, playing for a great stake and leading an army which has twice manifested its superiority solely on account of the superior ability of the generals at its head, hurled his troops with unparalleled recklessness against a commanding position, defended by the most powerful artillery, and were driven back with fearful slaughter. Weakened, disappointed, discomfited, he has now abandoned the purpose of the campaign, and is endeavoring to secure a retreat into Virginia. The probabilities are that he will succeed in this, or if driven to bay, the foe is yet capable of fighting a battle, upon the result of which it is not safe to count with absolute certainty.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1919, the Eagle reprinted the following article from Popular Mechanics: “Experimental airship models, called helicopters, designed to rise from the ground by the action of horizontally revolving propellers, have actually flown years before the airplane was dreamed of. A toy model was demonstrated by two Frenchmen in 1784; another steam-driven machine is said to have flown across two large fields in 1842. And today, regardless of the airplane’s remarkable development, many inventors are still busy with machines of this type. The designer of the model has so much confidence in his ship that he plans to commence manufacture on a modest scale. It would be instructive to learn what happens when the motor stops in actual flight.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1919, the Eagle said, “Perhaps the Red demonstrations were postponed on account of the heat … The crimson uprising was confined to the thermometer.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1926, the Eagle reported, “Seldom have patriotic exercises been held under more impressive surroundings than the memorial church service conducted on Sunday afternoon by the Kings County Historical Society in the chapel of Greenwood Cemetery in honor of the signers of the Declaration of Independence. Led by Charles A. Ditmas, the president of the society, more than 100 members gathered in the impressive granite chapel and spent a reminiscent hour with the nation’s dead and solemnly resolved ‘that these dead shall not have died in vain.’ The hills of Greenwood Cemetery had, perhaps, never before thrown back in echo the soul-stirring refrain of ‘America, the Beautiful’ and other patriotic anthems.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1951, the Brooklyn Spectator reported, “G.I.s are now SOLDIERS. The Department of the Army has informed all Army Public Information Officers to ‘make no further use of the slang expression G.I. ‘In speeches and in writings,’ the directive continues, ‘all references to a man of the Army should identify him primarily as a SOLDIER.’ The change was announced in the latest issue of the Army Public Information Division Liaison Bulletin. ‘Webster’s dictionary defines a soldier as a skilled warrior, and never before in history has a soldier so richly deserved this definition. It is in recognition of the dignity of the fighting man and the traditions of his service to America that we shall henceforth call him SOLDIER,’ said Captain William Pratt. The Captain, who relayed this information to the local press, is in charge of the Recruiting Station at 217 Washington Street. He explained that the trick name ‘G.I.’ (which stands for ‘government issue’) developed and caught on during World War II. ‘The younger generation has forgotten, if they ever knew, the word SOLDIER,’ added the Captain.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1952, the Eagle reported, “CHICAGO (U.P.) — Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower today moved into Chicago to seek the Republican Presidential nomination and took personal command of his battle with Senator Robert A. Taft over contested delegates, predicting that a ‘shocked’ America will reverse the opposition’s early victories. Taft, just before he took off from Washington for the convention city, dismissed in advance the general’s protest as nothing more than ‘wild charges’ designed to cover up a shortage of delegate strength in the convention which opens here Monday. The United Press tabulation of first-ballot strength, including the hotly-contested Southern delegations as decided by the Taft-dominated National Committee, gave the Senator 530 votes compared with 425 for the general. Eisenhower expressed confidence the 1,206 delegates will turn the tide in his favor when the issue hits the convention floor. Bitterness over the delegate contests ran so high on both sides that G.O.P. elder statesmen feared the two rivals might kill party prospects for a victory in the November election.”

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Willie Randolph
Seth Wenig/AP
Sylvester Stallone
Mark Von Holden/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include “Duke of Earl” singer Gene Chandler, who was born in 1937; former President George W. Bush, who was born in 1946; “Hunter” star Fred Dryer, who was born in 1946; “Rocky” and “Rambo” star Sylvester Stallone, who was born in 1946; Hockey Hall of Famer and former N.Y. Rangers defenseman Brad Park, who was born in 1948; Oscar-winning actor Geoffrey Rush, who was born in 1951; “Moonlighting” star Allyce Beasley, who was born in Brooklyn in 1954; former N.Y. Yankees co-captain and N.Y. Mets manager Willie Randolph, who was born in Brooklyn in 1954; “Absolutely Fabulous” star Jennifer Saunders, who was born in 1958; rapper and actor 50 Cent, who was born in 1975; “Sister, Sister” stars Tamera and Tia Mowry, who were born in 1978; former N.Y. Giants running back Brandon Jacobs, who was born in 1982; and “GLOW” star Kate Nash, who was born in 1987.

George W. Bush
Alex Brandon/AP

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SEEING STARS: Major League Baseball held its first All-Star Game on this day in 1933. The game took place in Chicago’s Comiskey Park and Babe Ruth homered to lead the American League to a 4-2 victory over the National League. Prior to 1933, All-Star contests consisted of pre- and post-season exhibitions that often found teams made up of a few stars playing beside journeymen and minor leaguers.

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MEET THE BEATLES: John Lennon and Paul McCartney met on this day in 1957. In Liverpool, England, 15-year-old McCartney watched a band called the Quarrymen, led by 16-year-old Lennon. The two spoke later that day and went on to create the most legendary rock group in history.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Everywhere that freedom stirs, let tyrants fear.”

— former President George W. Bush, who was born on this day in 1946


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