Brooklyn Boro

July 5: ON THIS DAY IN HISTORY

July 5, 2024 Brooklyn Eagle History
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ON THIS DAY IN 1848, the Brooklyn Daily Eagle said, “FORT GREENE — The scene in Washington Park last evening was one of the most stirring and interesting that we ever witnessed on a similar occasion. The promised display of fireworks collected some twenty thousand persons of all ages, countries, sexes and callings. There was no brawling, no drunkenness, no expressions of dissatisfaction or disappointment, but all seemed to enjoy the display, or at any rate, the fine, cool air and the splendid view which was presented to the eye from every side. The dark horizon which rose above New York was illuminated by thousands of rockets which were sent up from every part of the broad expanse and could be distinctly seen, as they blazed along the sky. The earth and air were filled with sounds of rejoicing. The immense auditory which had assembled on the Green remained until the last piece emblazoned the liberty of 1776, and then swept down the hill in vast waves, still cheerful and happy, and went to their homes to finish up the day’s pleasures by exhausting the private stock of pyrotechnics which they had laid in for the occasion.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1891, the Eagle reported, “BANGOR, ME., JULY 4 — Ex-Vice President Hannibal Hamlin died suddenly tonight at 8:15 o’clock. He was downtown this afternoon and went to Tarratine club rooms, where he was playing a game of cards, when his head fell forward on his chest. A gentleman remarked: ‘The senator seems to feel badly.’ Mr. Hamlin said: ‘I do.’ The men gathered around him and he was taken to a lounge. Dr. Robinson, who was in the next room, attended him, and afterward Drs. Mason and Phillips were called. No pulse was visible for an hour and it was thought they could not bring him out. Finally he revived somewhat, and managed to articulate feebly. The doctor worked over him faithfully and his family was sent for. Soon Mrs. Hamlin, General Charles Hamlin, his son and his wife and other members were at his side. All was done for him in human power, but failed, and he passed away peacefully at 8:15 p.m.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1924, the Eagle reported, “COLOMBES, FRANCE (A.P.) — The eighth Olympic games in the modern series were officially opened in the Colombes stadium today by Gaston Doumergue, President of the French republic. The formal parade which featured the colorful ceremonies was started shortly after 3 o’clock with the South African representatives leading. The day of the official opening broke dull and gray, but as the afternoon approached and all Paris seemed to be wending its way to the stadium the sun came from behind the thick clouds. More than 20,000 persons were in the stands half an hour before the arrival of President Doumergue and were entertained by the band of the Republican Guards playing lively music and by choruses singing hymns in honor of the Olympics written for the occasion. The parade of the athletes began to the strains of martial music, the various delegations circling the stadium amid continuous cheering, the volume of which rose and fell according to the sympathies of the spectators or the number of supporters present in the stands. The American athletes received a tremendous ovation, the appearance of none of the national delegates, unless Belgium were excepted, being greeted by such a vociferous outburst. It was estimated that at least 5,000 persons from the United States were in the stands cheering the splendid showing made by their athletic representatives, who also received a great hand from the French. There were more than 300 Americans in the ranks of the marchers, about 225 of them athletes and the remainder coaches and officials.”

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ON THIS DAY IN 1962, the Brooklyn Heights Press reported, “Brooklyn Heights clergymen have indicated that in the main they support the June 25 decision by the United States Supreme Court declaring unconstitutional a religious prayer drafted by the New York State Board of Regents for use in the schools. Declaring their views either in prepared statements or in answer to questions by this newspaper, the ministers of the First Unitarian Church, Plymouth Church of the Pilgrims and Spencer Memorial Church expressed their support of the Supreme Court’s decision banning the use of the prayer in New York State schoolrooms, where it had been read every morning. The only religious establishment here to indicate any opposition to the decision to date was the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, 170 Remsen St., which issued a statement the day after the announcement of the decision. The statement supported the minority opinion of Justice Potter Stewart.”

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Shohei Ohtani
Ashley Landis/AP
Edie Falco
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

NOTABLE PEOPLE BORN ON THIS DAY include singer-songwriter Huey Lewis, who was born in 1950; Baseball Hall of Famer Goose Gossage, who was born in 1951; former Aerosmith guitarist Jimmy Crespo, who was born in Brooklyn in 1954; Pro Football Hall of Famer James Lofton, who was born in 1956; “Calvin and Hobbes” creator Bill Watterson, who was born in 1958; “Walking in Memphis” singer Marc Cohn, who was born in 1959; “Nobody’s Fool” star Pruitt Taylor Vince, who was born in 1960; “The Sopranos” star Edie Falco, who was born in Brooklyn in 1963; “Law & Order: Criminal Intent” star Kathryn Erbe, who was born in 1965; World Cup-winning soccer player Megan Rapinoe, who was born in 1985; and L.A. Dodgers star Shohei Ohtani, who was born in 1994.

Huey Lewis
Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

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CIRCUS LIFE: P.T. Barnum was born in Connecticut on this day in 1810. He opened Barnum’s American Museum in 1842, promoting unusual acts such as Chang and Eng (the original Siamese twins) and General Tom Thumb. In 1850 he began promoting Jenny Lind, “the Swedish Nightingale,” and parlayed her singing talents into a major financial success. In 1871 “The Greatest Show on Earth” opened in Brooklyn. Barnum merged with his rival J.A. Bailey in 1881 to form the Barnum and Bailey Circus. He died in 1891.

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SKIN IN THE GAME: The bikini was introduced on this day in 1946. The skimpy two-piece bathing suit created by Louis Reard debuted at a fashion show in Paris. It was named after a Pacific atoll where the hydrogen bomb was first tested.

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Special thanks to “Chase’s Calendar of Events” and Brooklyn Public Library.

 

Quotable:

“Without promotion, something terrible happens … nothing!”

— showman P.T. Barnum, who was born on this day in 1810


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